Environment

Chad Lampe, WKMS

Today we met Rhett Butler, a loveable large puppy. He weighs 50 pounds, is six months old and "as solid as can be," says Kathy Hodge of the Humane Society of Calloway County. His breed started a discussion involving Staffordshire terrier to a border collie lab mix. He's mostly black with a white stripe on his face and white paws. His foster parent says he tends to be very quiet. 

Marek Szucs, 123rf Stock Photo

A Kentucky program that increases the amount of produce in food banks is paying farmers more for their crops. The Kentucky Farms to Food Banks program wants to make sure farmers can cover the cost of growing, picking and getting their produce to food banks. 

NOAA Paducah, weather.gov

8:26: In second tornado near Trigg/Christian County line, Ky State Police troopers report structural damage to barns near KY 126 north of KY 129, no homes damaged.  

7:53: A tornado warning issued for Hopkinsville until 8:15  

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has scheduled meetings in Louisville and Lexington for the public to weigh in on plans by utilities Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities to shut down their coal ash ponds at several power plants. 

Pennyrile Forest, parks.ky.gov

Four parks in the far western part of the commonwealth are among Kentucky State Parks getting additional state funding for infrastructure, safety and aesthetic improvements. 

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

Federally-protected ospreys are slowing the demolition of the old Eggner’s Ferry Bridge over Kentucky Lake.

Energy Transfer

McCracken County emergency management officials are getting the word out about construction now underway on an existing natural gas pipeline that runs through far-western Kentucky.

Marek Idowski, 123rf Stock Photo

Food banks in Kentucky are preparing for increased demand after new food stamp rules went into effect this week. The changes require able-bodied adults without children to work, volunteer or be in job training 20 hours a week.

WKMS File Photo

Kentucky’s coal industry continued its freefall in the first quarter of this year, according to data released Monday by the state Energy and Environment Cabinet.

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