Education

The House and Senate are working to reconcile their versions of a tax plan, but one thing is certain: Big changes are ahead for the nation's schools and colleges.

K-12

Let's start with K-12. There, Republicans from both sides of Congress generally agree on two big changes.

Saving for private school

Jessica Ladd was sexually assaulted while at Pomona College, just as one in five college women are. She says she found the reporting process, "more traumatic than the assault" itself. She felt "like I didn't have control. A lack of agency. I wasn't believed, and ended up regretting reporting."

Jacob Ryan/WFPL, Cropped

The University of Louisville has had its probation lifted a year after being sanctioned by its accrediting agency during a period of turmoil. 

School voucher programs need (at least) three key ingredients:

1. Multiple schools (don't roll your eyes, city dwellers, this one's a brick wall for many rural parents).

2. A system that makes private schools affordable for low-income parents. Choice isn't choice if it's only the rich who get to choose.

3. And transparency, so that a child's caregiver can review the options and make an informed choice.

This story is about that last ingredient.

melpomen, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky is among states that have cut public education funding most deeply over the last decade, according to a new report from the Center on Budget Policy Priorities.

Drew Bergman via Facebook

A Youth Suicide Prevention speaker is returning to west Kentucky on Thursday to speak with middle and high school students.

On this edition of “Old Kentucky Tales,” we will look at watching the news past and present in our “Yesterday’s News” segment, and for our “Main Event” we will look at some incredible political foreshadowing in a stump speech Ronald Reagan gave in Louisville.

Special Thanks to our Sound Engineer Todd Birdsong, the Paducah School of Art and Design, and WKMS. – And the Rest is History

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray State University Board of Regents Finance Committee, along with most of the other Regents met Tuesday afternoon to discuss potential financial challenges in the forthcoming years at Murray State. President Bob Davies said many of the unknowns (like state appropriation and pension liability) may be answered in the upcoming legislative session, but felt the discussion couldn't wait until then. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray State Board of Regents Finance Committee is holding a special meeting Tuesday afternoon to discuss financial challenges.

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On this edition of  “Old Kentucky Tales,”  a very special guest – He is the author of multiple

books on Kentucky History such as The Hidden History of Kentucky Soldiers and the forthcoming Kentucky’s Rebel Press – He’s as smooth as Obama, yet as fiery as Trump. Professor Emeritus of History at WKCTC. Berry Craig. We’ll also discuss  football past and present and we’ll remember the 1906 “Skunk Scarf.”

Special Thanks to our Sound Engineer Todd Birdsong, the Paducah School of Art and Design, and WKMS. – And the Rest is History

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