Education

NICHOLAS BRAKE, FACEBOOK

The Kentucky Music Educators Association has named the superintendent of Owensboro Public Schools as Administrator of the Year.

It has been a year since Betsy DeVos was sworn in as education secretary, and this month marks the first anniversary of our weekly education news roundup!

Let's pause to mark those moments ... and then get on to this week's headlines.

bcnow.berea.edu

  The bill U.S. lawmakers passed to keep the government open exempts a small Appalachian college in Sen. Mitch McConnell's home state from a costly tax on its endowment.

 

Berea College does not charge tuition and only accepts students who cannot afford to pay. The school relies mostly on its $1 billion endowment. But the Republican tax plan that passed last year included a tax on the school's endowment that would have cost it $1 million a year and forced it to accept fewer students.

Nicole Erwin / WKMS

Marshall County High School, where two students were killed in a shooting last month, has begun using metal detectors as an added security precaution.

"In the ways that we teach and learn about the history of American slavery," write the authors of a new report from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), "the nation needs an intervention."

Welcome to our weekly education news roundup. This week, we thought we would devote some time to President Trump's State of the Union speech, which had very little education news to round up.

In fact, that word appeared only twice in the speech, both times in passing reference while he was talking about other topics.

What the president did have to say came about halfway through the speech, in this one line: "Let us open great vocational schools so our future workers can learn a craft and realize their full potential."

Marshall County Emergency Management Facebook Page

  A dozen golden retrievers brought relief to students at Marshall County High School this week.

Mike Moran, the principal at Bryan Adams High School in Dallas, says oftentimes when students are homeless, they're too embarrassed to tell anyone.

"A lot of times it is revealed that there's a temporary living situation, they're in a motel, they're now staying with an aunt and uncle," he says.

Principal Moran has heard similar stories about 50, or so, kids at his school, just one of dozens of high schools in the district. That's why Dallas schools have put something called a drop-in center at nearly every high school in the district.

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Like most schools in the region, Murray State University had a wintry start to the Spring semester, but things are kicking into gear despite delays. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with MSU President Dr. Bob Davies about some of those efforts, along with the university's connection to Marshall County High School in the wake of a recent tragic shooting, what Governor Matt Bevin's proposed budget cuts could mean for the university and strategic plan and enrollment efforts.

When we read books, why do we forget so much of what we read, in only weeks or even days after we read it?

Coming across an article on this topic by Julie Beck in The Atlantic over the weekend, I found insight and even some consolation. I'm not the only one who forgets the plots of novels I've truly loved.

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