Chalermchai Chamnanyon, 123rf Stock Photo

Attorneys in Lexington’s U.S. Attorney’s Office are noting the importance of minimum sentences for opioid trafficking convictions tied to overdose deaths. Three convictions in federal court occurred Monday.

James Sweasy

Beginning this week doctors fighting the region’s opioid addiction crisis will have a little more to work with. The federal government will allow doctors to treat more patients with a drug called buprenorphine. That medication has solid support from science, but remains controversial in some circles. Aaron Payne of Ohio Valley ReSource visited three addiction treatment centers with three very different approaches, and found that there’s no silver bullet when it comes to addiction. 

Chalermchai Chamnanyon, 123rf Stock Photo

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says a new federal law can begin to turn the tide of drug fatalities in Kentucky and nationwide. 

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Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner has signed legislation banning the sale of synthetic drugs known as ‘bath salts’ in the state. Rauner signed the bill aimed at curbing what he called an ‘epidemic’ afflicting rural communities. 


Recently appointed co-chair of the National Substance Abuse Committee and Commonwealth Attorney General Andy Beshear is focused on providing Kentucky with funding and resources needed to treat opioid and other drug abuse.

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Kentucky overdose deaths rose 16% in 2015, the first year state lawmakers toughened penalties for traffickers and increased spending on addiction programs. 

The first time Ray Tamasi got hit up by an investor, it was kind of out of the blue.

"This guy called me up," says Tamasi, president of Gosnold on Cape Cod, an addiction treatment center with seven sites in Massachusetts.

"The guy" represented a group of investors; Tamasi declines to say whom. But they were looking to buy addiction treatment centers like Gosnold.

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Attorney General Andy Beshear’s Office is providing more than $700,000 to substance abuse treatment facilities statewide to combat Kentucky’s opioid drug epidemic. 

Graves Co. Sheriff's Office

Update Friday afternoon: The Graves County Sheriff's Office says the real identity of the methamphetamine supplier is Jose A. Garcia-Orinia. He had previously given the officers an alias.

He has now also been charged with Giving an Officer a False Name, 2 counts of Theft of Identity and Criminal Possession of a Forged Instrument 1st Degree. He's being held at the Graves County Detention Center with a $250,000 cash bond.

Somsak Sudthangtum, 123rf Stock Photo

A judge has unsealed records from a Kentucky lawsuit against the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, including the secret testimony of a former company president.