drug abuse

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Kentucky educators will be trained this week on how to administer a heroin antidote. The drug Naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan, is being made available to high schools who voluntarily choose to participate. 

As Heroin Overdoses Surge In Louisville, Search For Answers Continues

Sep 1, 2016
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Elizabeth Boccieri has been using meth and oxycontin in the past few days, ever since she heard about extra-strength laced heroin that’s been making its way south from Ohio to Louisville.

The Food and Drug Administration is warning that patients and doctors should more fully understand the potentially life-threatening risks of combining anti-anxiety or sleep medications with prescription opioids.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says a new federal law can begin to turn the tide of drug fatalities in Kentucky and nationwide. 

Chalermchai Chamnanyon, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet has awarded $15.7 million dollars to eight areas of program areas combating heroin and substance abuse. 

The fraud scheme began to unravel last fall, with the discovery of a misdirected stack of bogus prescriptions and a suspicious spike in Medicare drug spending tied to a doctor in Key Biscayne, Fla.

Now it's led to two guilty pleas, as well as an ongoing criminal case against a pharmacy owner.

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Earlier this month, the circulation of plant seeds containing a psychoactive chemical compound similar to LSD led to the hospitalization of five Stewart County High School students.

The seeds of Hawaiian Baby Woodrose – a climbing vine – contain lysergic acid amide, or LSA.

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Kentucky students are being recruited to spread the message about the dangers of prescription drug abuse.

State Attorney General Jack Conway announced yesterday the start of a public service announcement contest for middle and high school students.  As part of the competition, Kentucky students will produce a 30-second video showing the perils of prescription drug abuse.

A new study has found a dramatic drop in the number of teens abusing prescription drugs.

The Lexington Herald-Leader and The Courier-Journal reported on results of the 2012 Kentucky Incentives for Prevention School Survey released Friday.

It found that since 2008, prescription drug abuse dropped from 15.2% to 9% among high school seniors and from 6.5% to 2.9% among eighth graders.

Several states hard hit by prescription drug abuse will work together to develop strategies to combat what authorities say is an ever-growing problem. Kentucky will join Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon and Virginia in the initiative.

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