driving

Andriy Popov, 123rf Stock Photo

An app designed to stop texting and driving is getting the attention of law enforcement officials in Kentucky. WKYT-TV reports that authorities are praising ‘LifeSaver,’ which blocks a phone's screen while driving, as a tool that can prevent car accidents. 

Todd Arena, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates.

Youry Ermoshkin, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky saw a greater number of highway fatalities in 2015 according to the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety and Kentucky State Police. 

Amid low gas prices and a stronger economy, Americans are driving more than ever before, with new federal government figures showing traffic volumes are at an all-time high.

However, there is a downside to this resurgence of driving: increased traffic congestion and pollution.

New data from the Federal Highway Administration show that Americans drove a record 3.15 trillion vehicle miles last year — that's the equivalent of traveling from Earth to Pluto and back 337 times.

A growing number of Americans are driving less and getting rid of their cars.

The trend is gaining traction in middle-aged adults, to the point where fewer of them are even bothering to get or renew their driver's licenses, but it's been prominent among younger adults — millennials — for years now.

"Honestly, at this point, it just doesn't really seem worth it," says 25-year-old Peter Rebecca, who doesn't own a car or have a driver's license. "I mean, I live in Chicago, there's really good access to, you know, public transits for pretty cheap."

Kentucky State Police Post 1 Officer Jay Thomas visits Tracy Ross on Sounds Good fore details on the Click It or Ticket campaign across the U.S. and Commonwealth. The effort is to bring awareness to the issue of wearing seatbelts. Thomas says he'd much rather see people buckled up at traffic checkpoints than give tickets. Thomas says much of the traffic fatalities in 2013 involved victims who weren't wearing seatbelts.

Each year, nearly 10,000 people die on the road due to drunk driving, which is the equivalent of 20 jumbo jets crashing each year and killing all aboard. In order to stop this deadly epidemic, law enforcement in every state and most US towns and cities will be cracking down on drunk driving through Labor Day. Murray Police Department Crime Prevention Sergant speaks with Chad Lampe about the crackdown.

KY Teen Driving Deaths On The Rise

Feb 27, 2013
Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Teen driving deaths in Kentucky doubled last year, according to new research released by the Governors Highway Safety Association.

http://www.kentuckystatepolice.org/

There's a new Kentucky State Police campaign to improve safe driving across the state. The project is known as Operation R.A.I.D., for "Remove Aggressive, Impaired and Distracted" drivers from Kentucky roads. The agency says it has kicked off the six-month effort, which will continue through the fall and the holidays into the New Year. 

Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky State Police say drivers in the fall are likely to see deer on or near roadways, a serious issue that caused nearly 3,000 wrecks in the state last year. State police spokesman Sgt. Rick Saint-Blancard says three of the wrecks were fatal. 

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