The United State's Enrichment Corporation is ending uranium enrichment at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant saying that there were not enough taxpayer benefits to extend enrichment.

USEC has operated the DOE's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion plant since July 1993 and will stop enriching uranium at the end of May. USEC expects to begin reducing the plant’s workforce in the coming months. However, the corporation plans to continue managing inventory and meeting customer orders in addition to transitioning the plant back to the DOE into 2014.

Department of Energy

The United States Enrichment Corporation and several other companies have sent proposals to the Department of Energy to continue enriching uranium at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. USEC is currently operating at the plant but is scheduled to end its work there May 31. USEC spokesperson Paul Jacobson says the corporation is discussing a several month extension at the plant, but that doesn’t change its statement that the high costs and old technology makes continuing commercial endeavors beyond 2013 difficult.

The U.S. Department of Energy is seeking proposals from companies for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to try to cut costs while preserving some or all of the 1,200 jobs at the the uranium enrichment site.

An emailed release from the DOE details a formal request for proposals from companies that want to lease or purchase the facility for commercial purposes.


The United States Enrichment Corporation today entered into a multi-party arrangement with Energy Northwest, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to extend uranium enrichment operations for about a year at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Ky.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear has joined with members of the Commonwealth's congressional delegation to press the US Department of Energy to offer a plan for the future of Paducah's government-owned nuclear enrichment plant.  The plant could cease operations later this year, eliminating about 1,200 jobs.  Beshear sent a letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu Monday, saying lack of action by the DOE is putting a major economic engine in western Kentucky at risk.  Beshear's letter came days after Republican Senate Leader Mitch McConnell, Senator Rand Paul and Representative Ed Whitfield call