Documentary

The Seer: A Portrait of Wendell Berry, a documentary premiering today at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Austin, conveys the joys of living in a rural American community and, also, the hellish changes to that manner of life wrought by massive industrialization.

The film takes place in Henry County, Ky., where writer and activist Wendell Berry's family has farmed the land for 200 years.

From the book William Kelly A True History of the So-Called Bessemer Process by John N. Boucher, Public Domain

 

The production explores the history and mystery of western Kentucky’s early 19th century iron industry and how one of the men behind it, William Kelly, developed the process of refining iron into steel that kickstarted America’s rise to industrial might.

However, there is much controversy surrounding Kelly’s invention and whether industrial espionage took it to Great Britain to begin the steel revolution there.

Todd Hatton, WKMS

Click here for the complete audio

Explore the mystery surrounding the innovation that made the industrial might of America and the United Kingdom possible in the latest WKMS documentary production, Western Kentucky A Birthplace of Steel.

The production explores the history of western Kentucky's early 19th century iron industry and how one of the men behind it, William Kelly, developed the process of refining iron into steel that kickstarted America's rise to industrial might. There's also look at the controversy surrounding Kelly's invention and whether industrial espionage took it to Great Britain to begin the steel revolution there.

The documentary airs Friday, May 15 at noon and again Sunday, May 17 at 9 a.m.

racialtaboo.com

Be intentional. It isn't enough to feel in our minds a certain way about inqequality and injustice, but showing that feeling is so important, says Beth Khadem of the Paducah NAACP Racial Unity Group. She and Cal Ross, Executive Director of the Paducah Housing Authority, join Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about reinvigorating the group with racial unity efforts in Paducah, including film and discussion at Maiden Alley Cinema and a "Race Story Rewrite" all-day workshop in May.

Amazon.com

Listen Thursday, October 2 at 12:30 p.m.

Meet Sam Spade, detective, lady-killer. Before it became a classic film, it was first an incredible moral tale of crime and deception. Find out why in this Big Read Documentary, produced by the National Endowment for the Arts. Hopkinsville was one of 77 communities in the country to receive a grant celebrating literacy in events spanning six weeks. Last week, we spoke with Pennyroyal Arts Council's Margaret Prim about the series

About the Documentary:

    

WKMS News presents a new documentary: Living on the Line: Poverty in Western Kentucky.

Living on the Line tells the story of three families, each making less than a living wage. They share stories of dealing with hardships, trying to move forward and staying optimistic in spite of their situations. Each family has hope for better days and works to get out of poverty.

Tonight, a BBC film crew will be in Paducah to shoot part of a documentary about Southern music. Specifically, they'll be visiting a square dance, and it just so happens that the person who organized the BBC's visit is the one person to talk to if you want to know anything about Southern music or Southern culture: Dirt Daubers and Shack Shakers frontman J.D. Wilkes. Todd Hatton speaks with the musician, author, and filmmaker about how he got the BBC's attention.

The Kitty League was a Class D Kentucky-Illinois-Tennessee baseball league in action from 1903 to 1955, with a few years off in between. Kate Lochte speaks with independent documentary producer Josh Maxwell about his Kickstarter campaign to create a documentary about the Kitty League, about which he's already written a book.

theywillendure.org

A few weeks back we heard about holiday activities raising money for a new documentary produced about Pope County and today we meet its producer. The film is titled "They Will Endure," and it covers how the county was settled in the late eighteenth century to the great flood of 1937.

It was inspired by the research, writings, and archives of the late Pope County historian Mildred McCormick. Producer Richard Kuenneke took on the job of weaving McCormick's work together with interviews of residents and other historians.

Murray State’s NPR station, 91.3 WKMS presents the second program in its “Sounds Good Documentary Series” with a re-airing of Kentucky Dam Power for the People on Tuesday, June 25 at noon, during the second hour of Sounds Good with Tracy Ross. The special hour-long documentary underwritten, in part, by Hunter Marine of Nashville and Paducah, first aired Sunday, June 3, and chronicles the Dam’s inception, construction, and impact on the region through human stories. A soundtrack of music and archival newsreels help set the scene for the documentary.

Click here for the documentary's program page.

Pages