DNA

Shawn Hempel, 123rf Stock Photo

Police would collect DNA samples from Kentuckians arrested for felony crimes under legislation that passed a Senate committee Thursday. The DNA samples would then be sent to the Kentucky State Police crime lab, where they would be uploaded to an FBI database. 

Editor's note: This post was updated Feb. 3, 2016, at 12:25 pm to include a statement from the Food and Drug Administration and a comment from Mark Sauer.

Would it be ethical for scientists to try to create babies that have genetic material from three different people? An influential panel of experts has concluded the answer could be yes.

The Kentucky Department of Corrections has outlined a plan to remedy a faulty DNA collection system for convicted felons months after the Office of the Inspector General reported that more than 16,000 DNA samples were missing.

In 2009, the state legislature passed a bill requiring the collection of DNA samples from convicted felons. So the Department of Corrections delegated that responsibility to its probation and parole officers. But this summer, the inspector general's  investigation found that that this wasn’t happening.


The House has passed a bill that would require police to take DNA samples from people they arrest on felony charges. The vote was 68 to 27 Thursday. The bill will proceed to the Senate for consideration.

If the measure becomes law, Kentucky would join the federal government and 25 states that take DNA samples from felony arrestees. The U.S. Supreme Court this year will consider the constitutionality of the testing based on a Maryland case.

The House Judiciary Committee has passed a bill that will require police to take DNA samples when they arrest people on felony charges. If the measure is approved by the full Legislature, Kentucky would join 25 other states that take DNA samples from felony arrestees.

The vote was unanimous and will proceed to the full House for consideration.