Jimmywayne / http://www.photoree.com/photos/permalink/3433507-61278305@N00

  Political junkies in Kentucky believe history will be made this weekend at the Fancy Farm Picnic, as the stage will host what is believed to be the first black female candidate. Jenean Hampton is the Republican candidate for Lt. Governor. And just as the stage party has lacked diversity over the years, so has the audience.  

Niaz Khadem

The Paducah Racial Unity Group held several showings of the film Racial Taboo at Maiden Alley Cinema over the past month, to a strong and diverse attendance. Group organizers Beth Khadem and Lincoln Heights Missionary Baptist Church pastor Reverend Alfred Anderson visit Sounds Good to discuss the next steps in a six-part series of workshops called "Continuing the Conversation," which start tonight.

The Big Smoke book cover, adrianmatejka.com

Update: This reading was rescheduled to April 2, due to winter weather in February. This conversation was re-broadcast on Sounds Good, April 1.

In 2013, Penguin Books published Adrian Matejka's book about the flamboyant boxer Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champion of the world who held the title from 19088 to 1915. The book received the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award recognizing its important contribution to the understanding of racism and human diversity. Writing for Boston.com of The Boston Globe, John Freeman says that Matejka's voice is that of the boxer: "The gold-toothed, Shakespeare-loving, womanizing child of ex-slaves talks jive, taunts opponents, and muses philosophical about the American condition: 'When I clinch a man/it's like being swaddled in forgiveness.'" Kate Lochte visited with Matejka about The Big Smoke ahead of his reading Thursday night at Murray State.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Update: We've included  the March 12 conversation from Sounds Good with Kate Lochte, Nikki Radford and  Ellen Gilbert of the Global Education Center. In this conversation, Gilbert explains the Global Education Center and previews the musicians and dancers at the festival.

The Hopkinsville International Festival, now in its sixth year, showcases some of the cultural diversity in the region. Featuring a global village, performance on two stages, food, lectures, language courses and more, it's a weekend that brings people together in an interactive nature that allows folks to engage, says event coordinators Nikki Radford and Nina Shalom. They speak with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good with a preview.

The number of people who identify as belonging to two or more races keeps climbing with each Census. The number of people identified as both black and white, for example, more than doubled between 2000 and 2010, from about 780,000 to 1.8 million.


Be intentional. It isn't enough to feel in our minds a certain way about inqequality and injustice, but showing that feeling is so important, says Beth Khadem of the Paducah NAACP Racial Unity Group. She and Cal Ross, Executive Director of the Paducah Housing Authority, join Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about reinvigorating the group with racial unity efforts in Paducah, including film and discussion at Maiden Alley Cinema and a "Race Story Rewrite" all-day workshop in May.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University's President's Commission on Diversity and Inclusion is a governing body on campus responsible for planning, developing, improving and evaluating diversity efforts including the Campus Diversity Plan. On Sounds Good, Dr. Don Robertson, Vice President for Student Affairs and chair of the Commission, and Caroline Atkins of the Department for Continuing Education join Kate Lochte to talk about how the latest Campus Climate Survey from 2014 compares to one conducted in 2005.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress

WKMS celebrates Black History Month with a unique collection of vignettes during Sounds Good all month long, a limited-run series on the life and music of Duke Ellington and special programming covering "Race and Fear" in America, the Civil Rights movement from Seneca Falls to Selma to Stonewall, and a special report following three African American women coping with breast cancer.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University begins Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemorative events early with a candlelight vigil and march Sunday evening, with community breakfasts Saturday in Paducah and Monday in Murray. A series of presentations follow, including the screening of Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom by Cinema International. MSU Multi-Cultural Affairs Director S.G. Carthell and Cinema International Coordinator Tim Johns join Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about MLK Day and diversity events this semester.

Washington University

Degrees from Yale, the Jewish Theological Seminary and Harvard are Rabbi Pamela Barmash's academic credentials as a professor of Hebrew Bible at Washington University in St. Louis. Barmash speaks at 4 PM Thursday, February 27 in Freed Curd Auditorium for the 2014 Social Work Lecture Series. She was a fellow at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. She is on the Committee of Jewish Law and Standards for Conservative Judaism and has served as Rabbi for a Massachusetts Temple. Kate Lochte speaks with Rabbi Barmash ahead of her presentation.