diversity

There's a compelling question at the heart of a report released this week by the Metropolitan Planning Council: If more people — especially educated professional white Americans — knew exactly how they are harmed by the country's pervasive racial segregation, would they be moved to try to decrease it?

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State's 2017 Presidential Lecture centered on the theme "We have a dream. Are we living it?" with personal experience and insight from three alumni discussing diversity efforts in higher education.

Farmers in the U.S. like to point out that their products feed people all over the world. And while this is a diverse country, the people working on farms and elsewhere in agriculture often don't reflect the nation's demographics. Changing that is becoming a priority, in hopes that new people will bring fresh ideas to meet some of our food system's greatest challenges.

president.tennessee.edu

University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro lauded his school system's commitment to diversity while acknowledging "some tension" as UT tries to be more inclusive. 

belchonock, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky Supreme Court says judges don't have authority to dismiss randomly selected jury panels because of a lack of racial diversity. 

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Murray State President Dr. Bob Davies speaks with Matt Markgraf on Sounds Good about the #RacersCare campaign, an update on performance funding, efforts underway to increase diversity in students, faculty and staff, understanding the budget advisory committee and 'entrepreneurial opportunities' and his thoughts on the possible payroll tax. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Addressing the campus community Thursday, Murray State University President Dr. Bob Davies touted department, faculty and staff accolades and touched on how the university plans on navigating through sociopolitical and economic challenges. Davies delivered his State of the University Address, titled "Lofty Aims and High Aspirations: Our Most Significant Fortune" at Wrather Museum. 

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn't let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there's a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

neabigread.org

We hope you join us for a panel on Race Relations in Hopkinsville on October 22 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the War Memorial Building, titled "Where are we now, where do we want to be, and how do we get there?"

A panel of community leaders generate discussion on issues facing Hopkinsville. Panelists are Reverend Lisa Lewis-Balboa, Gwenda Motley, Matt Snorton, Judge Arnold Lynch, and Chief Clayton Sumner. WKMS is moderating the discussion.

Jimmywayne / http://www.photoree.com/photos/permalink/3433507-61278305@N00

  Political junkies in Kentucky believe history will be made this weekend at the Fancy Farm Picnic, as the stage will host what is believed to be the first black female candidate. Jenean Hampton is the Republican candidate for Lt. Governor. And just as the stage party has lacked diversity over the years, so has the audience.  

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