The Food and Drug Administration is leaning on the food industry to cut back on the amount of sodium added to processed and prepared foods.

The FDA on Wednesday released a draft of new sodium-reduction targets for dozens of categories of foods — from bakery goods to soups.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beating the drum again: We're consuming too much sodium and it's a reason we have such high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Not me, you say? Well, chances are, yes, you.

The Food and Drug Administration is seeking your input to answer a question: How should the agency define "natural" on food labels?

Disagreement over what "all natural" or "100 percent natural" means has spawned dozens of lawsuits. Consumers have challenged the naturalness of all kinds of food products.

For instance, can a product that contains high fructose corn syrup be labeled as natural? What about products that contain genetically modified ingredients?

When it comes to enjoying the flavors in food, our tongues really aren't that useful. They can detect just a few basic tastes: sweet, salt, sour, bitter, umami, and maybe fat.

Most of the kids in the U.S. don't get much time to eat lunch. And by the time those kids wait in line and settle down to eat, many of them feel rushed.

And a recent study suggests that this time crunch may be undermining good nutrition at school.

Sergey Bogachuk, 123rf Stock Photo

As we head into the autumn months our minds may go to all of the delicious food associated with the holidays. While many focus on heart health, it's also important to give your brain the things you need to be as healthy as possible. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Lisa Raum, registered dietician and Nutrition Affairs Program Manager of the Southeast Dairy Association, about ways to defend yourself over the cold months with healthy tips to "feed your brain." 

The Marketing Of Moringa: Is This The New Kale?

Sep 21, 2015

The moringa tree is a scrappy plant that grows like a weed in dry, tropical climates and produces bitter leaves that taste like horseradish. Moringa is also contending for a spot as the next hot "superfood," with an emerging focus on its potential to make life better for people in developing countries. Moringa supplements and bars are also becoming more popular here in the U.S.

Participation in sports by girls and young women has soared in recent decades — by 560 percent among high school students since 1972, and 990 percent among college students, according to the Women's Sports Foundation. Highly committed young female athletes now run track and play soccer, basketball, water polo and other demanding sports that require strong bodies.


Next week is National Eating Disorders Week, with the theme of "I Had No Idea" for 2015. Many people who are aware of eating disorders may not think they have one, but the campaign seeks to educate people on healthy methods of managing weight along with empowerment activities that help individuals embrace positive qualities in themselves as opposed to an unrealistic ideal. Murray State's Women's Center Director Abigail French discusses events at Murray State University for the awareness week, Tuesday and Wednesday.

Janine, Wikimedia Commons

Southeast Dairy Association's nutrition affairs program manager Laura Marbury says new research shows that the most important lesson of the day for better students could be eating breakfast. Marbury is a registered dietitian, responsible for implementing nutrition programs for health professionals, educators and consumers throughout Tennessee and Kentucky. Prior to joining the Southeast Dairy Association, she served as a medical nutrition therapist at UAB Hospital in Birmingham, Alabama, where she provided diet recommendations and education to oncology, obstetric and pediatric patients. She and Kate Lochte discuss breakfast eating strategies.