Diabetes

Undiagnosed diabetes may not be as big of a public health problem as thought.

That's the takeaway from a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine that says that some previous efforts have likely overestimated the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes because they relied on a single positive test result.

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly.

Appalachian Health Falling Further Behind

Aug 24, 2017
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A new report shows just how far Appalachia has fallen behind the rest of the country on key health measures such as rates of cancer, heart disease and infant mortality. Researchers say the region’s health gap is growing and they hope the data they’ve compiled will spur new approaches to health care.

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Mario Alberto Maciel Tinajero looks like a fairly healthy 68-year-old. He has a few extra pounds on his chest but he's relatively fit. Yet he's suffered for the last 20 years from what he calls a "terrible" condition: diabetes.

"I've never gotten used to this disease," he says. Maciel runs a stall in the Lagunilla market in downtown Mexico City. This market is famous for its custom-made quinceañera dresses and hand-tailored suits.

Depression prompts people to make about 8 million doctors' appointments a year, and more than half are with primary care physicians. A study suggests those doctors often fall short in treating depression because of insurance issues, time constraints and other factors.

A drop in the number of newly-diagnosed diabetes cases is good public health news. But for the Type 1 diabetes community it's a source of frustration, because the numbers hide their story.

If you have a daily coffee habit, here's something to buzz about: A new study finds those cups of joe may help boost longevity.

About 25 to 30 percent of people prescribed statins dump them within a year. I flunked Lipitor after a few wretched months.

Statins are prescribed to lower cholesterol in people who show risk factors for cardiovascular disease or diabetes, or who already have them. Side effects can include muscle weakness, diabetes onset and, rarely, permanent muscle damage. These risks are higher in women, with age, and with certain heart and blood pressure drugs.

We continue a series of reports called Racer Scholar Profiles, highlighting Murray State Faculty research, scholarly and creative activities across college and schools. Our fourth guest is Dr. Jason Jaggers, Assistant Professor, Applied Health Sciences in the School of Nursing and Health Professions, who studies exercise concepts in special populations, including those with diabetes and HIV. Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Jaggers on Sounds Good about his research.

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The University of Kentucky will use a $12 million federal grant to reduce the negative health and environmental impacts found at hazardous waste sites. 

UK Superfund Research Center According to Director Bernie Hennig, lab studies are indicating healthy individuals stand a better chance of warding off contaminants.

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