Democratic

A bruised Hillary Clinton will have much to prove as she takes the debate stage Tuesday evening alongside four of her Democratic presidential challengers. The former secretary of state has been damaged by lingering questions about her private email server and doubts about her trustworthiness.

That has partly enabled Vermont independent Sen. Bernie Sanders to ride a wave of progressive support to a lead over her in New Hampshire and an impressive $25 million fundraising haul last quarter.

There are those of us, of sufficient vintage, who can recall people saying, “If you want to vote in Kentucky, you register as a Democrat.”  That always seemed to be a little bit more true here in western Kentucky, the birthplace of Alben Barkley, Wendell Ford, Ned Breathitt, Ruby Laffoon, and Julian Carroll. Of course, western Kentucky is more competitive today politically, but one has to wonder how our part of the Commonwealth became a Democratic bastion in the first place. Dr. George Humphreys is the director of Madisonville Community College’s Muhlenberg campus and an alumnus of Murray State’s History Department.  He’s the author of The Democratic Rock of Gibraltar: The Rise and Fall of Western Kentucky Democratic Politics Since the New Deal, slated to come out next spring.  He’s on the line today to speak with us about it.

Lieutenant Governor Jerry Abramson's assertion that the Fancy Farm picnic is no longer a relevant political event has inspired a growing backlash.

In remarks reported by CN2, Abramson dismissed the picnic, saying it's too rowdy. But Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, who emceed this year's event, says when statewide officials skip the picnic, as Abramson did this year, it hurts the church and community that put the event on.

"Fancy Farm just isn’t about politics, it’s a church charity event and it’s a huge economic draw for people in Western Kentucky,” Comer says.