Debt Ceiling

U.S. Congress

Congressman Ed Whitfield (R-01) will vote in favor of a bipartisan Senate plan that will reopen the U.S. Government and increase the U.S. debt limit.

FRANKFORT — Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear offered sharp criticism of Congress, chiding the nation’s lawmakers for being out of touch with their constituents and for causing needless pain across the state through the ongoing federal shutdown.

Update at 10:18 p.m.: House Approves Bill:

The crisis is over. With about two hours before the country reached the debt ceiling, the House has approved the bill and it is now it's way to the White House. We've posted separately on that development and we are putting this live blog to bed.

Our Original Post Continues:

Political battles over the debt limit have been around nearly as long as the law passed by Congress in 1917 that set a statutory limit for how much debt the Treasury could accrue.

Since then, Congress has had to increase that limit on more than 100 occasions — and 40 of those times, lawmakers have tried to tie strings to raising the debt ceiling. In the last few years, though, there's been a marked escalation in those demands.

This post was last updated at 7:19 p.m. ET.

After an hour-long meeting with President Obama, Republicans said they have agreed to keep talking, in hopes of bridging a gulf that has already led to a government shutdown and is threatening the first default in U.S. history.

LRC Public Information

Kentucky's 3rd District U.S. Congressman John Yarmuth believes House Speaker John Boehner  could bring a quick end to the partial government shutdown that began Tuesday. The Jefferson County Democrat appeared Thursday on Insight Cable’s Pure Politics.

“There’s only one way that this impasse can be avoided and that’s if Speaker Boehner decides that he can rely on democratic votes and combined with republican votes to get the government functioning again and also to defaulting on our debts as a nation which will happen in a couple of weeks if we don’t act," said Yarmuth.

Yarmuth said the continuing resolutions House Republicans have been approving to fund parts of the government are a waste of time.

Senator Rand Paul is upset President Barack Obama will not debate spending cuts in talks over raising the debt ceiling. Many Republicans have threatened to block any increase in the nation's debt unless the president agrees to cut the budget elsewhere.

U.S. Congress

Kentucky First District Congressman Ed Whitfield (R) says he’s against closing off waters close to Cumberland River dams to boaters and fisherman. Army Corp of Engineers officials say the restrictions would include closing off 400 feet of water upstream and 700 downstream from Barkley Dam.

Congressman Whitfield says the enforcement changes are unnecessary. He says,

“There have been like three deaths since ’96 and there’s been one death at Barkley. The goal is no deaths. But there has not been any number of deaths or increase in dangerous activity or deaths to justify changing this management plan.”

The Corps of Engineers says the access restrictions are already part of their river management plan, but have not been enforced. Whitfield says he plans to meet with the head of the Corps early next month to request that they don't change the management plan and allow boaters to fish near the dams.

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