Datebook

Datebook
1:44 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

Datebook: May 3 - Kentucky Derby First Nationally Televised 60 Years Ago

We're all busy planning our Cinco De Mayo / Kentucky Derby parties this weekend, and you'll probably be watching the Derby on television... Today marks the 60th anniversary of the first nationally televised Kentucky Derby, which was broadcast on WHAS, the then-CBS affiliate out of Louisville. That year, Hill Gail took the prize at 2:01.60. He was raced by the renowned Calumet Farm of Lexington. An injury kept him from racing Preakness and Belmont Stakes. This year, the show will be broadcast on NBC at 6:23 p.m. EST.

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Datebook
11:22 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Datebook: May 2 - The Jack Benny Program Debuts 80 Years Ago

The Jack Benny Program, starring Jack Benny, is a radio-TV comedy series that ran for more than three decades and is generally regarded as a high-water mark in 20th-century American comedy. Benny first appeared as a guest of Ed Sullivan in 1932, and was given his own show later in the year with Canada Dry Ginger Ale as the sponsor on the NBC Network, continuing for six monts until moving to CBS. The program utilized a show-within-a-show fomat, where the main characters played versions of themselves.

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Datebook
11:08 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Datebook: May 1 - Calamity Jane Turns 160

Martha Jane Cannary Burke was born on May 1, 1852 (and died August 1, 1903). She was an American frontierswoman and professional scout better known as "Calamity Jane." She was an acquaintance of Wild Bill Hickok and famous for having fought Native Americans. She's said to have also exhibited kindness and compassion, especially to the sick and needy. A popular belief is that she acquired her nickname as a result of her warnings to men that to offend her was to "court calamity."

It’s Tuesday, May 1

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Datebook
10:00 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Datebook: April 30 - Louisiana Becomes 18th State 200 Years Ago

Even though Louisiana is a popular target for natural disasters, it's not hard to see why people have been drawn to the beautiful, rugged wetlands of the Bayou State for thousands of years. First, the Native Americans, then French and West African slaves formed the Creole culture, then the Cajun culture was brought by Spanish immigrants.

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Datebook
10:00 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Datebook: April 27 - Ulysses S. Grant Turns 190

Ulysses S. Grant was the 18th President of the United States, following his dominant role in the Civil War. Under Grant, the Union Army effectively ended the Civil War with the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox. As General, he led the Army through Kentucky and most of Tennessee, earning a fierce reputation for combat at the Battle of Shiloh and later the Battle of Chattanooga.

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Datebook
10:57 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Datebook: April 26 - Frederick Law Olmsted Turns 190

Frederick Law Olmsted was born on April 26, 1822 (and died August 28, 1903). He's popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture. His legacy of design includes Central Park in New York City, the Buffalo park system in New York, Niagara Reservation in Niagara Falls, the Emerald Necklaces in Boston and Rochester, the Grand Necklace in Milwaukee, Cherokee Park and the park system for Louisville, America's first wading pool in Massachusetts, Chicago's parks for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, landscaping around the Capitol Building in D.C.

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Datebook
11:34 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Datebook: April 25 - First Execution by Guillotine 220 Years Ago

The French Penalty, by Francisco de Goya

Nicolas Jacques Pelletier was a French highwayman who had the unfortunate timing of being the first person to be executed by means of the guillotine. He was arrested for assault, robbery, and possibly rape and was issued a death sentence by decapitation. He waited in prison for three months while the guillotine was built in Strasbourg. His execution was a public spectacle with high security.

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Datebook
2:53 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Datebook: April 24 - Farragut's Flotilla Steams Past Forts to take New Orleans 150 Years Ago

"Damn the torpedoes. Full steam ahead!" Though famous Union Admiral David Farragut wouldn't say these words for another two years (the Battle of Mobile Bay), it encompassed his general strategy for taking New Orleans from the Confederates, of which he was en route on this day in 1862. He had been given command of the Western Gulf Blockading Squadron and set his fleet of 24 wooden ships down the Mississippi River to reduce Confederate defenses. On April 24, he famously blew past Forts Jackson and St.

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Datebook
11:18 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Datebook: April 23 - St. George's Day

Today is St. George's Day, a feast day celebrated by Catholic and Anglican Churches, and nations of which St. George is the patron saint. It is the second most important National Feast in Catalonia, where it is traditional to give a rose and a book to a loved one. It's also the International Day of the Book, since 1616, the date of death and possibly anniversary of birth for William Shakespeare (Julian calendar) and Miguel de Cervantes (Gregorian calendar). In 1497, John Cabot flew the Cross of St.

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Datebook
10:32 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Datebook: April 20 - Louis Pasteur Develops Pasteurization 150 Years Ago

Louis Pasteur was a French chemist and microbiologist known for his remarkable breakthroughs in vaccinating rabies and anthrax, and for reducing mortality from fevers. He may be best remembered for the discovery that is his namesake: pasteurization, a method to stop milk, beer, and wine from causing sickness. His research showed that the growth of micro-organisms were responsible for spoiling beverages. So he invented a process in which liquids were heated to kill most the bacteria already present within.

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