cybersecurity

NPR Screenshot

  Visitors to the Equifax website might have encountered something a little odd Thursday afternoon. For some consumers seeking a credit report from the agency, the page that loaded was likely to disappoint them.

After a cyberattack that potentially exposed the personal information of 143 million people, the credit reporting agency Equifax set up www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, a website to help people determine whether they had been affected.

However, on multiple occasions over the span of weeks, the company's official Twitter account responded to customer inquiries by apparently directing them to a fake phishing site called www.securityequifax2017.com.

The Securities and Exchange Commission says cybercriminals got into the agency's files last year and accessed information that might have been used to give them a secret edge in trading.

The SEC says it had known about the intrusion in 2016 into its Edgar filing system, but learned this month that "nonpublic information" accessed may have been used for "illicit gain."

CREDIT MSU CENTER FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT, SECURITY MATTERS

  A conference next week at Murray State will demonstrate how cyber security issues could affect local business owners.

TSM at Murray State University, via Facebook

Murray State University TSM hosts Patterns of Distinction Security Matters conference April 28. On Sounds Good, Michael Ramage and Annie Dail speak with Tracy Ross about the goal of the conference and how businesses can become aware of providing levels of security against threats. 

The rumor mill is on.

A report by an Israeli newspaper, citing anonymous industry sources, pointed the finger at an Israeli company as the firm helping the FBI get inside the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

A cybersecurity measure was one of many provisions lawmakers tucked into the massive $1.1 trillion federal spending bill that Congress approved on Friday. It's aimed at fighting the theft of data held by big companies, by allowing those companies to share information with each other and with the government. But it has privacy advocates very worried.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The issue of cyber security has become increasingly relevant, with recent attacks on Sony, Target and Anthem making headlines over the past few months. Murray State's Center for Telecommunications Systems Management's Patterns of Distinction Security Matters is a one day technology security conference next Thursday, April 23, with a focus on how small businesses can protect themselves from evolving threats. The Center's Associate Director Michael Ramage joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good with a preview.

Dairy Queen Alerts Customers To Data Breach At Hundreds of Stores

Oct 13, 2014

Dairy Queen says nearly 400 of its restaurants across the country were affected by malware that found its way on to credit card terminals.

Those locations include stores in Bowling Green, Owensboro, Somerset, Beaver Dam, Danville, Central City, Russellville and Versailles along with restaurants in Evansville and New Albany, Ind.

The company says the data breach happened mainly during the month of August and affected names, credit card numbers and expiration dates.  But Dairy Queen says PIN numbers were not affected. 

The company says the malware has been removed and no longer poses a threat to customers’ data.

Beshear, Edelen Sign Cyber-Security Bills

Jun 11, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Steve Beshear and State Auditor Adam Edelen gathered in Louisville today for a ceremonial signing of a pair of bills—House Bills 5 and 232—intended to shore up Kentucky’s ability to protect citizens’ data from security breaches.

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