Matt Markgraf, WKMS, Courtesy of Pogue Library

Our Women's History Month Series continues with a look at the incredible collection of Alney Alba, a woman who was born and died in Calloway County, but spent most of her career in Hollywood and Broadway. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian at Murray State's Pogue Library about Alba's extraordinary careers as an actress, a poet and an artist, and how her very meticulously-kept life story ended up in Pogue's archives. 

Kentucky Chautauqua / Kentucky Humanities Council

In their book "A New History of Kentucky," historians Lowell Harrison and James Klotter called Madeline McDowell Breckinridge the most influential woman in the Commonwealth.  Breckinridge was a descendant of some of Kentucky's most prominent families, and she used the resources her name provided to advocate for women's suffrage.  She's also the subject of an upcoming Kentucky Chautauqua this Wednesday at the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts in Madisonville.  Todd Hatton speaks with Kelly Brengelman, who brings the progressive reformer to life.

The Seer: A Portrait of Wendell Berry, a documentary premiering today at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Austin, conveys the joys of living in a rural American community and, also, the hellish changes to that manner of life wrought by massive industrialization.

The film takes place in Henry County, Ky., where writer and activist Wendell Berry's family has farmed the land for 200 years.

Celebrate Women Luncheon, via Facebook

Monday is the 28th Annual Celebrate Women Luncheon recognizing efforts and accomplishments of women affiliated with Murray State University. Constance Alexander says she's been involved in the luncheon since she moved to Murray in 1988. This year, through a grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women, she's sharing writing from women's and LGBTQ groups, and reads some of the poems on Sounds Good

Genius and food have a lot in common. Both nurture, inspire and occasionally intimidate. Some appeal to almost everyone instantly. Others are acquired tastes. So perhaps it's not surprising that, scanning history's greatest minds, we find many were inspired by certain food or drink, repulsed by others —or had some very peculiar dining habits.

WKMS Song of the Day

Mar 8, 2016

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Forget all that stiff-upper-lip stuff. If you're looking for evidence that the British have a big, beating heart underneath their reputation for reserve and restraint, look no further than Sunday's finale of their popular TV export, Downton Abbey.

Twin Cities Restoration Foundation

The fundraising campaign to build a new Amtrak station in Fulton has raised more than $75,000. 

Courtesy of Rosa Hudspeth

Pogue Library at Murray State University is home to numerous special collections and oral history projects. One of these recordings is the voice of Murray resident Florence Kenley-Hudspeth, who is now 80. In an oral history recording with Murray State in 1979, she reflects on life growing up in a time when Murray was a segregated community. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, describing Hudspeth's experience growing up in the 1940s and 50s and her thoughts on the Civil Rights Movement.