Culture

Some songwriters are able to write songs about those turns in life too painful to talk about.

When I met Merle Haggard aboard his tour bus in the early summer of 2001, he no longer looked much like the hard-scrabble outlaw of his 20s, but a man who had been tempered by the ups and downs of riches and bankruptcy, love, loss and time. He had come a long distance since his boyhood in a converted boxcar on the wrong side of the tracks, growing up just outside of Bakersfield, Calif., and the troubled times when he served more than two years in San Quentin for robbery.

Acclaim Press

Dr. James Duane Bolin has written his "Home and Away" column for newspapers across Kentucky for over a decade.  They recount his travels throughout Kentucky and the United States, as well as his journeys in family, social, and academic life.

123rf Stock Photo

Keeneland opens its 2016 spring meet on Friday with new technologies for visitors new to the historic track. Keeneland spokeswoman Amy Gregory says the Race Day app now features a ‘bet simulator.’

Tennessee State Library & Archives (cropped)

The Tennessee State Library and Archives is looking to digitize records of how World War I affected Tennesseans.

Nikhil Gangavane, 123rf Stock Photo

You may have seen on television or movies the massive Spring festival of colors in India, known as Holi. This festival was celebrated across India last week but Murray State University's Indian Student Association brings the festival to campus this Saturday. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with the association's president Mayur Bhandare about the history and mythology of the holiday, how his family celebrates back home and the upcoming event on campus.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS - courtesy of Pogue Library

Folktales and legends, natural remedies and "old wives tales" have a remarkable way of traveling with settlers, taking on a life of its own wherever people settle. This region has no shortage of stories like these. Murray native Mildred Hatcher spent her lifetime collecting and preserving the folktales of Kentucky and Tennessee. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Pogue Library Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian about Hatcher's love of folktales and her impressive collection at Murray State.

WKMS Song of the Day

Mar 28, 2016

Library of Congress, Harris and Ewing Collection

One of the few complaints, if not the only one, about the 1979 biography Dear Alben: Mr. Barkley of Kentucky was that people wanted more.  And in 1979, author Dr. James Libbey agreed, setting out to provide a more comprehensive look at the Commonwealth's most prominent political icon of the 20th century.

But, as it sometimes can, life got in the way.

"In 1981," Libbey said, "I was an academics administrator, so my plate was full, and I then had major surgery which, at the time, just knocked the stuffing out of me."  However, in 1986, Libbey returned to the classroom and decided to resume work on the biography of the man he calls "one of the most popular politicians of his time."

Courtesty of Dave Winder Murray State University

  It was once assumed that the role of women in our society should be secondary to men.  This mentality was prevalent from households to schoolyards for years in the U.S. and Paint Rock Valley High School in Princeton, Alabama was no different. As the women would sit inside each day and watch while their male peers were allowed outside to play sports, Nita Graham grew bored. That was almost 70 years ago.

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