criminal justice

lrc.state.ky.us

A major criminal justice reform bill will be back before state senators when they re-convene at the end of this month. The measure, placing a heavy emphasis on inmate re-entry into society, was approved by the House Wednesday.

A record number of people, at least 166, were exonerated last year after being wrongly convicted of crimes, according to the most recent annual report from the National Registry of Exonerations.

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The Kentucky Senate has approved a bill designed to make it easier for people with criminal records to get a job. 

LRC Public Information

The Kentucky Senate will consider a lengthy criminal justice reform bill after a Senate Judiciary Committee approved the measure without testimony and little debate.  

The measure resulting from months of study focuses on ways to move more inmates into productive roles in society and save corrections dollars.  Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Whitney Westerfield said the legislation will improve public safety. “I think it will hold offenders accountable,”  Westerfeld said. “I think it will reduce recidivism and reduce future crime.”  

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Gov. Matt Bevin has thrown his support behind a far-reaching criminal justice bill intended to keep those charged with crimes from re-offending after they’re released from prison.

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A sweeping criminal justice bill has been filed in the Kentucky General Assembly. It aims to provide workforce training for state prisoners, fight drug addiction and increase penalties for some crimes.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

State lawmakers return to Frankfort Tuesday after a break in this year’s General Assembly. With nearly two months left, the legislature is likely to consider major changes to the public education and criminal justice systems, giving the governor more power to reorganize university boards and altering the way medical malpractice lawsuits progress through the courts.

Governor Matt Bevin, Facebook

Gov. Matt Bevin has signed an executive order that would remove questions about criminal convictions from job applications to work in the state executive branch.

Bruce Rauner / Facebook

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed a package of criminal justice legislation, saying the system "needs to be approached with more compassion."  

The Republican governor signed the five bills this morning (Monday) at an Illinois Department of Corrections adult transition center in Chicago.  

Nodar Kherkheulidze, Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Matt Bevin said he wants Kentucky to “lead the way” on criminal justice reform and has appointed a council tasked with producing legislative ideas for next year’s General Assembly.

The 23-member committee includes state officials, legislators and advocates from around the state.

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