The Courier-Journal

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL

A ruling by Kentucky's attorney general says the University of Louisville violated the state's open records law by denying a newspaper's request for emails on the former university president's hard drive.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky's attorney general says the economic development cabinet wrongfully denied a newspaper's request for the names of investors in a company that received millions in public funding for a new aluminum plant.

Andy Beshear, Matt Bevin, official photos

The Kentucky attorney general's office says it can't determine whether a board inspecting Gov. Matt Bevin's Louisville home violated open meetings law because it doesn't know if public business was discussed during the inspection.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky’s attorney general is continuing criticism of Gov. Matt Bevin’s purchase of a mansion in suburban Louisville.

KEVIN WILLIS

  A Kentucky family court judge says he won't hear anymore adoption cases that involve gay adults.

J. Tyler Franklin

A report written by an attorney for a special House committee says the panel couldn't prove that Gov. Matt Bevin stopped a road project in retaliation against a Democratic lawmaker who rejected the governor's request to become Republican.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin took to social media Wednesday to levy attacks on a political opponent and the state’s largest newspaper, falsely claiming that Attorney General Andy Beshear had dropped his defense of a controversial new ultrasound abortion law and that the Courier-Journal falsely reported on the issue.

Courier-Journal logo, via Facebook

The Courier-Journal's new executive editor is Joel Christopher, vice president of USA Today Network-Wisconsin. 

A state judge has fined the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services more than $750,000 dollars because it "willfully circumvented" open-records law by not fully releasing records of child abuse fatalities and near deaths.

Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled Monday that the cabinet made a "mockery" of the Open Records Act by maintaining that documents remain confidential. Shepherd ordered the cabinet to pay the plaintiff's attorney fees and costs to be decided.

A Louisville attorney on Tuesday called for a criminal investigation into the former head of the Legislative Research Commission who told a Kentucky newspaper that he returned to the Capitol on Sunday, two days after he resigned, and shredded documents.

Thomas Clay wants state police or the attorney general's office to open a probe into what kind of documents former LRC Director Bobby Sherman destroyed.

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