corn

Corn harvest continues to speed ahead of schedule

Sep 5, 2012
Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. corn harvest continues ahead of schedule with some states nearly half-finished at a time when they usually are just getting started.  In its weekly crop update, the USDA says little has changed in the condition of drought-damaged corn and soybeans. That's because the plants are too far along for recent rain to make a difference.  Corn was planted several weeks earlier this year and matured more quickly in the summer heat, allowing farmers to start harvesting early.  Tennessee has almost half of its corn in, compared to the usual 21 percent.

Franzfoto, Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer is warning livestock producers and corn growers to take steps to avoid harming livestock by feeding them drought-stricken corn silage. 

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Extreme heat and little rains have all but doused any hopes for a successful corn crop in our region. Kentucky’s corn and soybean crops rank lowest for field conditions, according to The National Agricultural Statistics Service.

Drought Hits Western Kentucky Crops Hardest

Jun 26, 2012

Western Kentucky’s corn and soybean crops have taken a turn for the worse. Statewide crop-reporting says one-fourth of the corn crop is in poor condition, and another third is fair. 

Afternoon Round-Up 4/05/12

Apr 5, 2012
Derek Bridges / wikimedia commons

Today on NPR: Critics say the NYPD's aggressive stop-and-frisk tactics amount to widespread racial profiling, but supporters counter that it's one reason the city's crime rate is as low as it is. Now, with the city's stop-and-frisk numbers reaching record highs, state lawmakers are pushing to rein the practice in.

Around the Commonwealth:

Author: Jim Champion, via Wikimedia Commons

National grain specialists are predicting a record amount of corn could go in the ground this spring.  As Kentucky Public Radio’s Stu Johnson reports, a rise in corn yields has been a trend in the commonwealth...

University of Kentucky Extension Professor of Grain Crops, Chad Lee says Kentucky’s corn acreage could go up about ten percent this year.  Lee says the profit potential is partly the result of warmer than usual weather.  He says, in the bluegrass, corn has gone from being the number three crop to number one in the last few years.

Nearly 90 percent of the corn in this country is genetically-modified. And as using genetically-modified—or GM—corn becomes increasingly popular in everyday foods, more people are becoming concerned about potential ill effects on human health and the environment.

Besides being used in food, that corn is also finding its way into Kentucky’s signature spirit: bourbon.

In the grain room at the Four Roses Distillery, master distiller Jim Rutledge is pours corn kernels into a small glass.

“I’m just going to heat this up,” he says.

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