Cooking

Stop Crying! Tear-Free Onions Are Here

Feb 8, 2018

Using onions to explain away crying is a familiar gag. On The Brady Bunch, housekeeper Alice answers the phone and cries as the caller tells her a sad story. After hanging up she says, "Darn onions," holding up the offending allium. And Rowlf the Dog sang on The Muppet Show, "I never harmed an onion. So why should they make me cry?"

Jason Smith, a cafeteria manager in Grayson, Ken., didn't have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith's dream came true.

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Steve Le has a lot of miles on him. He was born in Siagon in 1975. His family received political asylum when he was 8-years-old and moved to France. Two years later relatives sponsored Le and his family  to move to the United States, where they settled in southern California. Le loves the United States. He’s a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and served as a dive officer on a mine sweeper during the terrorist attacks of 9-11 and the invasion of Iraq.

Editor's note on March 27, 2018: You may have figured this out already — this story was an April Fools' joke. It's not real. We hope you enjoyed it.

What's the next big foodie enthusiasm? Robust flavors, earthy scents and lusty textures from the very soil that nourishes life.

It's called Veritable Cuisine du Terroir — literally, Food from the Earth Really — and in their copper-clad kitchen in the Marais district of Paris, chefs Solange and Gael Gregoire run one of the hottest bistros in a city long celebrated for its culinary prowess.

Nestled among rolling hills and grazing cows, Elmore Mountain Bread in central Vermont is quintessentially pastoral. The setting is apropos, given the owners' recent decision to start grinding their own flour by stone — a veritable step back in time.

Courtesy Grow Appalachia

Every few years, Appalachian food gets “rediscovered” by mainstream media outlets as an up-and-coming culinary trend. But does that interest actually benefit residents of the region as they navigate away from a coal-fueled economy?    Ashlie Stevens of member station WFPL looked at the pros – and cons – of the outside attention to Appalachia’s other natural resource. 

Is your doctor your go-to for nutrition advice? Neither is mine. And why would I expect that?

Remember the headlines a few weeks back, when the World Health Organization categorized red and processed meats as cancer-causing?

Turns out, the techniques you use to prepare your meat seem to play into this risk.

For those who like to try new recipes at Thanksgiving, let Clay Dunn and Zach Patton be your guides. They're the couple behind the food blog, The Bitten Word, and every year before the holiday, they scan 10 leading food magazines to identify recipe trends.

Editor's note: A version of this story originally ran in November 2014.

The countdown to Thanksgiving has begun. And for those of us who already feel short on time during a regular week, the pressure is on to figure out just how to squeeze in all that extra shopping, prep work and cooking ahead of the holiday.

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