concealed carry

Various positions regarding ‘concealed weapons’ have been discussed at Eastern Kentucky University today.  The debate came during the first Campus Safety Summit.


A group of Republican lawmakers in the state House are pushing a bill that would allow some residents to carry concealed weapons on public school property.


Illinois State Police has posted on its website a list of approved concealed carry firearms training curricula. The list has all skills required by the Illinois Firearm Concealed Carry Act.

It includes firearm safety; basic principles of marksmanship; care, cleaning, loading and unloading of a concealable firearm and transportation of a firearm.


Illinois is amplifying its argument that a federal judge reject a legal push by gun-rights advocates to immediately start carrying firearms publicly, rather than waiting months under the state's new concealed carry law.

The law that passed July 9 gives Illinois State Police six months to set up a concealed-carry program before accepting applications. Police then have 90 days to process the forms.


An Illinois state senator wants to add churches to the list of places where concealed guns wouldn't be allowed in new state law.

Park Ridge Democrat Dan Kotowski said he doesn't agree with a provision in the state's new concealed-carry law that allows guns in churches, temples or mosques. He filed an amendment to the law Monday and said he'll push for its approval.

Gov. Pat Quinn says a decision is “imminent” on whether he’ll sign a concealed carry bill.

Illinois faces a July 9 deadline to legalize carry of weapons after a federal appeals court found Illinois' ban unconstitutional. Quinn has given few hints about what he'll do.

Quinn could veto the measure which outlines who can carry.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is asking the U.S. Supreme Court for more time to decide whether to appeal a lower court's order saying citizens should be allowed to publicly carry concealed guns.

Madigan already got one extension — until June 24 — to challenge the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that said a ban on concealed firearms is unconstitutional. Now she wants until July 24.

Madigan filed the request late Friday.


The U.S. Supreme Court has given Illinois' attorney general more time to decide whether to appeal their ruling that the state's ban on the public possession of firearms is unconstitutional.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan now has until June 24 to ask the high court to hear the case.


The Illinois House has defeated a proposal allowing the carrying of concealed guns in public.   

The vote was 64-45 in favor of the bill. But it fell short of the needed 71 votes. A supermajority was necessary because the law would pre-empt the home-rule powers of several cities.

The legislation sponsored by Democratic Rep. Brandon Phelps would have required authorities to issue concealed-carry permits to anyone who passed background checks. Phelps used a legislative procedure that will allow him to recall the bill later for another vote.


The difficulty over how lawmakers will craft a law allowing public possession of guns in Illinois has been clearly demonstrated on the House floor.

After being goaded by a Democrat, a pro-gun Republican got upset during a debate yesterday on legislation that would let local law enforcement officials decide who gets a permit to carry concealed weapons.