Community College

The workforce is changing dramatically, and there's a widespread recognition that new skills — and new ways of teaching adults those skills — are needed and needed fast. In California, the state's 114 community colleges are facing the challenge of offering the credentials, classes and training that will help workers choose a career or adapt to a new one.

The system right now can't serve all of these workers. But there's a new idea that could come to the rescue: Create a new, online community college for people in the workforce who've been shut out of higher education.

The opportunity to go to college for free is more available than ever before. States and cities, in the last year especially, have funded programs for students to go to two-year, and in some cases, four-year, schools.

Tennessee has taken the idea one step further. Community college is already free for graduating high school students. Now Tennessee is first state in the country to offer community college — free of charge — to almost any adult.

Phillip M. Bailey

Hal Heiner, the secretary of Kentucky’s Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, says a new free community college tuition program will help put people who have exited the labor force back to work.

WKCTC Logo, Wikimedia Commons

West Kentucky Community and Technical College is one of ten finalists for the 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. WKCTC was named Tuesday as a finalist for the fourth time in the award's history.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Madisonville Community College will soon have a new president. Three finalists visited campus this week as the final stage of the search process. 

KCTCS

West Kentucky Community and Technical College has a new interim president and CEO. Kentucky Community and Technical College System President Jay Box has appointed Dr. Charles Chrestman. 

WKCTC Logo, Wikimedia Commons

A search to find the next president of West Kentucky Community and Technical College is about to start. WKCTC’s founding president Barbara Veazey is retiring June 30th after 14 years at the helm. 

Karen Roach, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky House of Representatives has approved a bill that would give free community college tuition to all of Kentucky's high school graduates. 

Almost a year after the president of Northern Kentucky’s state community college retired amid running tensions with its board of directors, the college’s foundation will begin paying him a $348,000 incentive in July.

Karen Roach, 123rf Stock Photo

Democrats in the Kentucky House are backing a new proposed program to ensure free tuition for up to six semesters at the state’s community and technical colleges. The Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship Program was formally unveiled Wednesday in the House chamber. 

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