College

Driven by higher tuition fees and tighter state funds, America's public colleges now get more money from their students than from all state sources. That's according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, which says tuition revenue reached 25 percent of the colleges' total in 2012.

The numbers are stark, with the GAO saying that from fiscal years 2003-2012, "state funding decreased by 12 percent overall while median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges."

Today the Education Department released long-awaited details on a plan to hold colleges accountable for their performance on several key indicators, and officials said they'll be seeking public comment on the proposals through February.

"As a nation, we have to make college more accessible and affordable and ensure that all students graduate with a quality education of real value," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement.

Murray State University's Great Beginnings brings Re'Nita Avery-Meriwether, Director of Student Life and the Curris Center, to Sounds Good. The official university welcome and orientation programs for new and returning Racers starts Wednesday, August 13 and continues through September 4.

Call it a sign of the times that right along with required writing core courses, incoming freshmen at most schools this fall will also face a mandatory crash course on the subject of sexual assault.

Good News for Kentucky College Grads

Aug 6, 2014
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Earnings outlook for college students who earn a degree in Kentucky are positive, according to the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics. Executive Director Charles McGrew who authored the 2014 Kentucky Postsecondary Feedback report, says the statistics include all students in the state of Kentucky who went on to post-secondary education. 

There's nothing funny about sexual assault. But the absurdity of how some colleges respond to it can make you laugh.

This week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart became the latest comedian to crack wise about the rape crisis on America's college campuses: Reports are up, yet many schools still fail to adequately address the problem.

There's plenty of anxiety in the U.S. over getting into a top college. But a new Gallup poll suggests that, later in life, it doesn't matter nearly as much as we think. In fact, when you ask college graduates whether they're "engaged" with their work or "thriving" in all aspects of their lives, their responses don't vary one bit whether they went to a prestigious college or not.

Encouraging numbers from the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics show nearly three out of five high school graduates in 2011 enrolled in college. Education Secretary Thomas Zawacki released the numbers yesterday.

More than 27,000 of the state's public high school grads in 2011 continued their educations.

Kate Lochte speaks with a grammar expert, Jeanne Clements on Sounds Good. She’s the creator of Verbal Education, a vocabulary training tool for taking college entrance exams. According to verbaleducation.com, the program is a method utilizing mnemonics for vocabulary with high-frequency in SATs and ACTs. The methods include visualization, associative memory, morphemic analysis, and more. Clements has a background of 25 years as an educator and currently directs the Association of Language Arts Teachers of America and is Vice-President of Intstructivision, Inc. See more at verbaleducation.com.

newgre.org

An Illinois college savings program that stopped taking applicants last year is back in business with a new management team. College Illinois allows parents to lock in a price for their children’s future tuition and save money to pay it.

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