coal mining

Hillary Clinton, who is campaigning in Appalachia this week, was confronted Monday by an out-of-work coal miner. At a roundtable discussion in West Virginia, Bo Copley asked Clinton, "How you can say you're going to put a lot of coal miners out of jobs and then come in here and tell us how you're going to be our friend. Because those people out there don't see you as a friend."

A coal-mining giant has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection amid an industrywide slump.

Peabody Energy — which is the biggest coal miner in the U.S. and says it is the largest private-sector coal company in the world — is looking to restructure its heavy debt load and gain relief from its creditors. It hopes to continue operations unimpeded.

Todd Hatton, WKMS

Anything is possible, but it seems unlikely that a Senate bill to abolish state mine safety inspections will pass the General Assembly this year. Legislators are scheduled to return to Frankfort next week for one day before concluding this year’s regular session.

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An investigation into an accident that killed a coal miner in Western Kentucky last year found he was crushed after workers propped up an 18-ton machine with a stack of wooden boards that gave way.  

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State inspections of Kentucky’s underground mines would be eliminated under a bill approved by the state senate on Thursday. Supporters say the measure reduces duplication of federal mine assessments. 

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Nearly $70 million in federal funds is now available for coal mining communities across the country. The Appalachian Regional Commission and the U.S. Economic Development Administration announced the funding on Thursday. 

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Leaders from the state’s coal-producing regions want counties to receive a greater share of coal severance tax revenue. Revenue from the severance tax is split evenly between the state and counties and has declined as a result of Kentucky’s flagging coal industry.

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Kentucky's Energy and Environment Cabinet secretary is not expecting any short term rebound in the eastern Kentucky coalfields. Charles Snavely appeared before the senate’s natural resources committee this week. 

Todd Hatton, WKMS

Kentucky Congressman Hal Rogers is sponsoring a bill that could send a billion dollars back to coal-producing states to help with economic development.

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Kentucky’s coal industry shed more jobs and production during the last quarter of 2015, according to new data released today.

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