coal mining

MSHA

Lawmakers and union leaders are raising concerns about the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration’s practices amid an increase in coal fatalities.  

MSHA

  President Trump has nominated a retired West Virginia mine executive to lead the nation’s top mine safety agency. David Zatazelo is the former head of Rhino Resources, a coal company that was the focus of scrutiny by regulators in 2011 over safety violations. The nomination comes as mine safety experts are expressing concern over a rash of fatal coal mining accidents. This year, 12 miners have died -- eight of them in West Virginia and Kentucky.

WKMS File Photo

A board that was ostensibly responsible for reviewing coal miners’ training and reviewing all proposed coal mine safety regulations will hold its last meeting next week.

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

Coal country is waiting to see if President Trump’s rollbacks of environmental regulations will boost the mining business. But some bipartisan proposals before Congress offer different ways to help. Ohio Valley ReSource reporters offer some analysis of three ideas that could help to mend mining country.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

Retired miners will not lose their health benefits, as had been feared, thanks to last-minute action from Congress. However, Congress did not act on the miners’ faltering pension benefits fund, which supports some 43,000 retired miners in the Ohio Valley region.

From video courtesy Sen. Joe Manchin

Congressional leaders are cautiously optimistic that a budget deal could protect health benefits for retired miners.

Courtesy CVI

When President Donald Trump signed his latest executive order last week, he surrounded himself with coal miners and returned to a familiar campaign theme: “job-killing” regulations. But in some corners of coal country, an environmental regulation is creating jobs. Stream restoration is part of a multi-billion dollar business, and some displaced miners are tapping into that revenue stream. Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports. 

Erica Peterson, WFPL News

Monday night at his rally in Louisville, President Donald Trump repeated a campaign promise, telling the crowd he would revive Kentucky’s beleaguered coal industry.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

President Donald Trump’s campaign-style rally in Louisville got the attention of some retired coal miners in the region. They’re particularly worried about being able to afford health insurance on a new plan.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawmakers in both Kentucky and West Virginia are working to loosen mine safety regulations, alarming some mine safety experts.

Pages