coal mining

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A multi-state coal company is shutting down their last active mine in Kentucky. 

Southwings and Vivian Stockman

The prestigious National Academy of Sciences recently announced a comprehensive study on the health effects of the controversial coal mining practice known as mountaintop removal. For coalfield residents who have long questioned what impact the dust, blasting, chemicals and water contamination was having, the announcement comes as welcome news, if somewhat overdue.  

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Refunds totaling nearly $180,000 are being delivered to fiscal courts in 33 counties from mining permit and acreage fees. 

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

This week a federal agency announced it will fund a million dollar review of current research on links between surface coal mining and human health risks. 

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At this week’s Democratic National Convention, two presidents ran blocks for Hillary Clinton on an issue that has crippled her favorability in Appalachia: coal.

Both President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton brought up coal in their speeches endorsing Hillary’s presidential bid.

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One of the largest coal operators in the region is striking deals so that the terms of its bankruptcy can be finalized in court. One deal protects hundreds of workers while another sets aside millions for environmental cleanup.

Rebecca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

Miners in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia who helped keep the country’s lights on are worried that their retirement benefits could go dark as a result of a wave of bankruptcies in the coal industry. They hope Congress will approve a bill called the Miner’s Protection Act to shore up the pensions and health benefits promised to union miners. 

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Coal giant Murray Energy says it is not expecting to lay off any of the 4,400 coal miners in six states who recently received notice that they could lose their jobs.

Becca Schimmel, WKU Public Radio

White signs advocating for the protection of pension and healthcare benefits were waived at a United Mine Workers of America rally in Lexington Tuesday. An estimated 4,000 miners, retirees, and family members filled the city’s convention center. They gathered to demand that Congress pass legislation protecting pensions and health care benefits for miners and their families.

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More than 100 retired coal miners and spouses from across the region will file into buses Tuesday for a mine workers rally in Lexington.

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