Coal Ash

Erica Peterson, WFPL News

The Tennessee Valley Authority will move forward with a plan to permanently store coal ash and other coal combustion residuals on TVA property at 10 locations. 


The Tennessee Valley Authority is proposing to build a facility to remove and recirculate water used in coal ash management at a Paducah area site. TVA is seeking public comment on potential environmental impacts of this facility at the Shawnee Fossil Plant. 

Erica Peterson |

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has scheduled meetings in Louisville and Lexington for the public to weigh in on plans by utilities Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities to shut down their coal ash ponds at several power plants. 

Waterkeeper Alliance Inc. / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Environmental groups are expressing concern over the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Draft Environmental Impact Statement that looks at closing 10 coal ash impoundments. The Southern Environmental Law Center, Sierra Club Beyond Coal, and nine other groups have partnered to comment on the draft, which assesses closure-by-removal and closure-in-place.

After a federal Court of Appeals rejected an industry-led challenge last month, a new federal rule to reduce coal miners’ exposure to dangerous dust goes into effect Monday.


The Tennessee Valley Authority is holding an open house in Paducah on Tuesday to discuss plans to close a coal ash storage facility at its Shawnee Fossil Plant. 

Waterkeeper Alliance Inc. / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

The Tennessee Valley Authority is planning to close coal ash storage facilities at several of its coal-fired power plants. Coal ash is waste generated from burning coal and contains contaminants like mercury and arsenic.

Erica Peterson


  The federal government has released the nation’s first-ever rules on how to handle, store and dispose of waste from coal-fired power plants. The final iteration of the regulations has largely disappointed environmental groups—who hoped for more stringent rules. Industry groups were more optimistic, but largely said they would have preferred the Environmental Protection Agency not finalize the rules at all and leave the matter up to Congress. The EPA was choosing between two options, and chose to regulate coal ash as akin to household garbage, rather than hazardous waste.

Four-and-a-half years after they were first announced, the Environmental Protection Agency plans to finalize the nation’s first federal rules on the handling of coal ash this month.

Update 1:25 p.m.: Comments from Division of Water and Louisville Gas & Electric.

After collecting a year's worth of images of what they say are illegal discharges from one of Louisville Gas & Electric's coal ash ponds into the Ohio River, environmental groups say they plan to sue the company.