Clean Air Act

Knowledgeum, via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Kentucky’s head environmental regulator says the state is hopeful the courts will rule upcoming federal carbon dioxide regulations are illegal.

But if not, the state will likely create a state plan to comply, he said.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

A bill that environmental groups say would damage the Clean Air Act is advancing through the House of Representatives. The bipartisan bill is spearheaded by Kentucky Congressman Ed Whitfield.

The bill—called the Ratepayer Protection Act—passed the House Energy and Commerce Committee last Tuesday. According to Whitfield, the bill is a “commonsense solution to protect ratepayers from higher electricity prices, reduced reliability, and other harmful impacts of EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan.”

TVA

The Tennessee Valley Authority is again asking the public to weigh in on the potential shutdown of two coal-burning units at McCracken County’s Shawnee Fossil Plant. 

The 2011 Clean Air Act agreement requires the TVA to reduce its electricity generating units’ air pollution emissions by 2017. 

Kentucky is one of 12 states that have joined a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed greenhouse gas regulations. The lawsuit asks the court of appeals in Washington, D.C., to overturn a previous settlement that forced the EPA to take action.

Erica Peterson

The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to propose rules regulating greenhouse gas emissions—like carbon dioxide –from existing power plants next June. But Kentucky regulators are preemptively trying to influence the agency’s decision-making.

iStock

A 2011 settlement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Valley Authority means 13 Kentucky organizations will receive a total of $11.2 million dollars in grants over five years. The settlement covers allegations that TVA violated the Clean Air Act.