civil rights

Society
2:12 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

50 Years Later: The Civil Rights March on Frankfort

1964 March on Frankfort
Credit kchr.ky.gov / Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

This week marks the 50th anniversary of a Kentucky event of importance not only for the state, but also for the nation. On March 5, 1964, over 10,000 people marched to Frankfort, Kentucky, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Jackie Robinson, demanding a law to end segregation in the Commonwealth. We hear the story with Kate Lochte, through the voices of a state employee of that time and an organizer of the event - who is still working for human rights.

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Society
12:11 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

UT Martin Hosts Nation's Oldest Civil Rights Conference

Credit utm.edu

This week, the University of Tennessee at Martin hosts "Freedom Summer: Fifty Years Later." It's their 14th Annual Civil Rights Conference featuring keynote speaker Mr. Dave Dennis, who participated in the first Freedom Bus ride from Montgomery, Alabama and in voter registration efforts during the 1964 Freedom Summer. Today, he works as the director and CEO of the Southern Initiative of the Algebra Project, a nonprofit that aims to improve mathematics education for minority children. UTM Department of History faculty member Dr. Renee LaFleur is coordinator for the conference and speaks with Kate Lochte about its events on Sounds Good.

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Government
1:56 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

50th Anniversary Civil Rights March on Frankfort

Credit kchr.ky.gov

As a young man, shortly out of high school, John J. Johnson was the president of the local NAACP in his hometown of Franklin, Kentucky, and was a member of the executive committee for the March on Frankfort 50 years ago, which is being commemorated this year. That first march touched the nation and ultimately helped lead to the passage of the U.S. Civil Rights Act on July 2 of the same year. Today, John J. Johnson is the Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, and speaks with Kate Lochte.

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Society
11:18 am
Fri September 13, 2013

50 Years Later: September Mourn, The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Bombing

50 years ago this Sunday, an explosion at an African-American church in Birmingham, Alabama killed four little girls in an act of racially motivated terrorism, marking a turning point in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. Commentator and Murray State History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this tragic moment, and its historical significance in contributing to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 

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Society
6:35 am
Wed June 12, 2013

50 Years Later: The Assassination of Medgar Evers

Medgar Evers
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Today marks 50 years since civil rights activist Medgar Evers was gunned down in his driveway in Jackson, Mississippi by white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith. His murder and the subsequent trial sparked a cultural uproar and inspired national protests. A week later, President Kennedy submitted his Civil Rights bill to Congress, and the March on Washington would follow that summer. Commentator and Murray State history professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on how he came to learn about Medgar Evers - his sacrifices, and his legacy. 

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Education
4:04 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Miranda Warnings Could be Required for Students

Credit Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky Supreme Court is expected to hand down a ruling soon on whether public school administrators should give the Miranda warning to students when they question them with a resource officer present.

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Culture
8:32 am
Mon September 10, 2012

KKK and ACLU Sue Cape Girardeau

rickcross.com

The Ku Klux Klan and the American Civil Liberties Union are suing the City of Cape Girardeau for infringing their First Amendment rights to free speech.  KKK members plan to distribute leaflets in Cape Girardeau on September 28th, but the city’s anti-litter ordinance prohibits placing handbills in or upon vehicles.

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Education
7:16 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Federal civil rights official urges high schoolers to speak out on bullying

Wikimedia Commons

It’s been 49 years since Dr. Martin Luther King gave his famous “I Have a Dream Speech,” yet a top civil rights official says he’s amazed at some of the discrimination and harassment that continues across the country.  Thomas Perez, head of the Civil Rights Division at the US. Department of Justice spoke to high school freshmen in Lexington Wednesday about bullying.

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Society
4:30 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame nomination deadline approaches

Charles W. Anderson, Kentucky's first African American legislator
kchr.ky.gov

There’s one week left to nominate human rights advocates for the 2012 Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame. 

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