CIA

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

WikiLeaks will be sharing alleged CIA hacking techniques with major technology companies such as Apple and Google to allow them to develop fixes for vulnerabilities in their phones and other electronic devices, according to Julian Assange.

In a lengthy address from Ecuador's Embassy in London, where he remains holed up since 2012, the WikiLeaks founder said the group would work with manufacturers to "disarm" purported CIA hacking tools. When the fixes are in place, he said, WikiLeaks would publish the code for those tools online.

WikiLeaks is billing its latest document dump as the largest leak of CIA material in the history of the spy agency, and it describes cutting-edge ways to hack into phones, computers and even televisions connected to the Internet.

The thousands of documents, many of which are highly technical, are said to be internal CIA guides on how to create and use cyber-spying tools — from turning smart TVs into bugs to designing customized USB drives to extract information from computers. The CIA has refused to comment on their authenticity.

Updated 5:15 p.m. ET

WikiLeaks has released thousands of files that it identifies as CIA documents related to the agency's cyber-espionage tools and programs.

The documents published on Tuesday include instruction manuals, support documents, notes and conversations about, among other things, efforts to exploit vulnerabilities in smartphones and turn smart TVs into listening devices. The tools appear to be designed for use against individual targets, as part of the CIA's mandate to gather foreign intelligence.

composite: CIA Logo (Facebook); Courthouse (Marshall County Fiscal Court)

A Marshall County man is charged with terroristic threatening after authorities received a tip from the Central Intelligence Agency about a bomb threat at the county courthouse.  

Wikimedia Commons

Courts should decide whether the U.S. should use drone attacks on American citizens who are abroad and accused of committing crimes against the nation, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said.

Paul told Kentucky Public Radio on Monday that he would prefer a judge or jury make those decisions, as they do with crimes committed inside the U.S.

CIA Director, and retired four-star general, David Petraeus returns to  101st Airborne Division, the unit he led into Iraq in 2003.  His visit caps a week of celebration at the post, as the 101st commemorates its 70th anniversary.  Petraeus will also attend a retirement ceremony for Command Sergeant Major Marvin Hill, who served under Petraeus as the senior non-commissioned officer.  After leaving the division, Petraeus served as the commander of U.S.forces in Iraq, was the head of U.S. Central Command and then was tapped by President Barack Obama to lead U.S. forces in Afghanistan.