Amy Roegler and her husband, Octavio Herrera, live with their young kids, Jake and Alyssa, in Los Angeles. When it comes to pro baseball, they're all Dodgers fans. And Jake loved balls even as a baby, Octavio says.

"We have a picture of him as a 3-month-old with a little Dodger jersey and a glove," Octavio says. "So he was definitely going to be introduced to sports early, and he took to it right away." Today 10-year-old Jake is on his baseball league's All-Star team.

Stu Johnson/WEKU News

  A ceremonial bill signing was held Monday for Kentucky's new, stricter vehicle booster seat law. But, enacting a new law doesn't guarantee parents will adhere to the stiffer guidelines. 

Oscar Cross Boys & Girls Club of Paducah, Facebook

 The mission of the Oscar Cross Boys & Girls Club of Paducah is to enable young people to be productive, responsible and caring citizens. The organization recently announced the June 1 closure of their midtown facility, which means a consolidation of young people into the newer Park Avenue location. WPSD Local 6 Anchor Todd Faulkner is President of the Board of Directors and joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about the closure, the challenge in overcoming financial struggles and how the organization helps give life skills to kids who need it most.

In this country, all children are supposed to have a shot at success — a chance to jump "from rags to riches" in one generation.

Even if riches remain out of reach, then the belief has been that every hard-working American should be able to go from poverty to the middle class.

On Tuesday, a book and a separate study are being released — both turning up evidence that the one-generation leap is getting harder to accomplish in an economy so tied to education, technological know-how and networking.

There's been national news this week about the loneliness of families living with autism spectrum disorder and finding little support. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Becky Nastally, who founded Bloom Behavior Therapy, LLC. in Paducah. She works with children with autism and other developmental disabilities, their families and the schools in which they study.

Kentucky children who receive Medicaid are prescribed medications to treat mental illness and behavioral issues at double the rate of the national average, according to research from the Child and Adolescent Health Research Design and Support Unit at the University of Louisville.

Kids' Drawings Speak Volumes About Home

Dec 8, 2014

When children reach 6 years old, their drawings matter.

Not because of those purple unicorns or pinstripe dragons but because of how kids sketch themselves and the very real people in their lives.

Study: Detergent Pods Can Harm Children Who Play With Them

Nov 10, 2014

It's generally a good idea to have the number of the poison control center handy. That's an even better plan if you have laundry detergent and small children at home.

For decades, poison centers received many calls each year about children swallowing laundry detergent or getting it in their eyes. That problem has gotten worse due to new highly concentrated single-load liquid laundry detergent packets.

Badgett Playhouse's Bill Minihan visits Sounds Good with Caroline van Heerde. She's the founder and director of Constru Casa, an organization that builds housing for families living in extreme poverty in Guatemala. Minihan's involvement with Constru Casa has led to more than $100,000 raised in our region to support its work.

Thursday, NPR's Steve Inskeep spoke with Sonia Nazario, the author of "Enrique's Journey," a book about a child from Honduras who reached the United States, and she says many of the thousands of Central American children crossing the U.S. - Mexico border are actually refugees, not migrants who mostly need to be sent home. Murray State College of Humanities and Fine Arts History Professor Dr. Bill Schell's areas of research involve Latin America and Mexico and Kate Lochte asks him about the background for the current spike in numbers of children trying to enter the U.S.