Cherokee

Book Cover, thepenguinpress.com

The Trail of Tears cuts through our region, the forced relocation of Native Americans following the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The events leading up to this moment are a complex story of Washington insiders, real estate moguls, a Cherokee chieftain, decapitations and mass protests circling around America's 7th president Andrew Jackson told in the new book Jacksonland by NPR News' Steve Inskeep. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Inskeep about how some of the events involve western Kentucky and the prices paid for this land.

Trail of Tears PowWow, Facebook

Trail of Tears Commemorative Park in Hopkinsville hosts its 27th Annual Pow Wow this weekend. Native Americans from across the nation come to compete in dances to the beat of authentic drumming, as well as to share fellowship with each other camping in the park. Trail of Tears Commissioner Peg Hays tells us more about the activities surrounding the dance circle on Sounds Good.

Trail of Tears 175th Anniversary Observed at MCLIB

Aug 12, 2013
pbs.org

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 brought more than 15,000 Cherokee through the WKMS service region.  Thursday at 7 p.m. the McCracken County Public Library presents the president of the Kentucky Trail of Tears Association, Alice Murphree of Hopkinsville, in observance of this year's 175th Anniversary of the Trail of Tears, part of the removal of native peoples from lands east of the Mississippi.  Ms. Murphree tells Kate Lochte more about the research she's done to certify sites on the Trail.