The U.S. Census Bureau has announced it will change the way it counts troops deployed overseas, while keeping its policy on counting prisoners for the upcoming national headcount in 2020. How these two populations are factored into the 2020 census could affect the balance of power in government at both the federal and local levels.

Gage Skidmore, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 2.0

  An amendment championed by Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator would change the way deployed military personnel are counted in the Census.

Rand Paul’s amendment would require the Census to count all deployed servicemen and women at the base or port where they lived before deployment. Currently, those individuals are counted as part of the U.S. overseas population.

The number of people who identify as belonging to two or more races keeps climbing with each Census. The number of people identified as both black and white, for example, more than doubled between 2000 and 2010, from about 780,000 to 1.8 million.


From NPR: Two different families talk about the identity struggles of being a mixed race. For one man, the ability to check both Asian and white on his last census form brought some unexpected tears.


Kentucky State Representative  Darryl Owens wants to change how prisoners are counted in census data.

Currently, inmates are counted as residents of the county they're imprisoned in. But Owens wants inmates to be listed as residents at their last home address.