cars

It has been a common belief that low-emissions vehicles, like hybrids and electric cars, are more expensive than other choices. But a new study finds that when operating and maintenance costs are included in a vehicle's price, cleaner cars may actually be a better bet.

The cars and trucks we drive are responsible for about a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions in this country. That's why Jessika Trancik, an energy scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, decided it was time to take a closer look at vehicle emissions.

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Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates.

A growing number of Americans are driving less and getting rid of their cars.

The trend is gaining traction in middle-aged adults, to the point where fewer of them are even bothering to get or renew their driver's licenses, but it's been prominent among younger adults — millennials — for years now.

"Honestly, at this point, it just doesn't really seem worth it," says 25-year-old Peter Rebecca, who doesn't own a car or have a driver's license. "I mean, I live in Chicago, there's really good access to, you know, public transits for pretty cheap."

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Kentucky economic officials don’t expect the recent Volkswagen emissions controversy to have a large impact on the state’s automotive industry, which contributes $14.3 billion to Kentucky’s gross state product according to a report from the University of Louisville Urban Studies Institute.

Beshear Announces New Ky. Auto Industry Group

Apr 7, 2014
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Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has announced the creation of a new group to promote and expand the auto industry in the state.

The 12-member Kentucky Auto Industry Association will be chaired by the Secretary of the Economic Development Cabinet, Larry Hayes. The panel will be made up of industry representatives and public officials.

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From NPR: You won’t see fins on the back of your car anytime soon. They disappeared for a reason: better aerodynamics equals better fuel efficiency.