carbon emission regulations

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, via Facebook

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce is among more than 160 business organizations from 40 different states that have filed a court document in support of a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan. That plan is aimed at reducing carbon pollution from power plants.

Wikimedia Commons/Author: PixOnTrax

Kentucky regulators are petitioning the EPA to re-open the public comment period on the federal carbon dioxide rules that were finalized in June.

Petr Kratochvil, publicdomainpictures.net

People on both sides of the energy debate seem to agree that costs for the consumer are going to go up.  

Clean energy and federal emissions standards were widely discussed this week at the 39th Governor’s Conference on Energy and the Environment.

Image: coalcampusa.com

  A federal judge in Colorado has ruled the federal government should have taken the indirect environmental effects of expanding the Colowyo and Trapper coal mines into account before issuing a permit. These “indirect effects” include the environmental toll of burning the coal in power plants. But because of differences in the way western and eastern coal mines are regulated, it’s hard to say what effect, if any, this ruling could have on Appalachian mines.

Petr Kratochvil, publicdomainpictures.net

The U.S. has submitted its carbon emissions reduction plan to the United Nations, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is already warning the rest of the world that America may not follow through on it.

The world’s two biggest emitters of carbon dioxide have reached an agreement on emissions reductions. The United States and China announced the deal yesterday, in a move that’s already being praised by environmental groups and panned by Congressional Republicans.

Kentucky is one of 12 states that have joined a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed greenhouse gas regulations. The lawsuit asks the court of appeals in Washington, D.C., to overturn a previous settlement that forced the EPA to take action.

The Environmental Protection Agency will hold hearings this week on proposed regulations to limit the carbon dioxide coal-fired power plants can emit. Environmental activists and coal industry supporters are both traveling from Kentucky to Atlanta this week for the federal hearing.

The EPA’s rule would cut carbon dioxide emissions nationwide. The proposal sets emissions goals for each state, and leaves it up to individual states to decide how to achieve those goals.  But before the rule is finalized, there are months of public comment. People can submit comments in writing, or make public statements at one of the four hearings happening this week. But Bill Bissett of the Kentucky Coal Association says it’s worth it to many to make the trek.

“I think the difference is, you can send a letter, you can send an email, but I think it’s important, one, that the people on the other side of this issue hear what we have to say as people who support coal,” said Bissett.  “But I think also, we need to hear what they have to say. To me, it’s a very democratic principle of this country, to be heard publicly."

Lawmakers Skewer EPA, Obama Over Coal Regulations

Jul 4, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

A panel of Kentucky lawmakers is criticizing an Environmental Protection Agency proposal to limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants

Members of the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and the Environment targeted the regulations Thursday which will require a nationwide 30 percent reduction in the gas that climate scientist say contribute to climate change.

tva.com

Carbon emissions in Tennessee dropped by a third over five years, according to a new study. It says the closure of coal-fired plants and the historically low price of natural gas are driving the trend.

“That has meant a less carbon-intensive fleet of electric-generating facilities within the state,” said Christopher Van Atten, the study’s lead author.

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