cancer

Pharmacies across the U.S. will begin receiving shipments of a generic form of the revolutionary cancer pill Gleevec this week after the drug lost its patent protection on Monday.

The generic version of drug, known as imatinib, is likely to cost about 30 percent less than brand-name Gleevec, says Kal Sundaram, the CEO of Sun Pharmaceuticals, the Mumbai, India-based company that will make the first generic.

Remember the headlines a few weeks back, when the World Health Organization categorized red and processed meats as cancer-causing?

Turns out, the techniques you use to prepare your meat seem to play into this risk.

blueringmedia, 123rf Stock Photo

Baptist Health Paducah is holding a vigil called "Shine a Light on Lung Cancer" tomorrow at 5 p.m. in the Larry Barton Atrium as a way to remember those who are struggling with lung cancer and those who have lost loved ones to the disease. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Dr. Nicholas Lopez, a cardiothoracic surgeon at Baptist Health Paducah, about lung cancer in our region, ways to prevent and manage the risks, and understanding what the treatment process is like.

The World Health Organization made an announcement Monday that's likely to come as a blow to anyone whose favorite outdoor snack is a hot dog.

Processed meats — yes, hot dogs, plus sausage, ham, even turkey bacon — are cancer-causing, a committee of scientists with WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded. And it classified red meat as "probably carcinogenic to humans."

Most women don't need to start getting an annual mammogram to screen for breast cancer until they turn 45, according to the latest guidelines from the American Cancer Society.

Previously, the society recommended women start annual mammograms at 40 and continue every year for as long they remained in good health.

A drug that's already approved for treating leukemia appears to dramatically reduce symptoms in people who have Parkinson's disease with dementia, or a related condition called Lewy body dementia.

A pilot study of 12 patients given small doses of nilotinib found that movement and mental function improved in all of the 11 people who completed the six-month trial, researchers reported Saturday at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago.

When I left my first mammogram appointment a few weeks ago, I felt fine.

Everything had gone smoothly, the technologist hadn't made a concerned face when she looked at the screen, and I was convinced I'd get the all-clear from my primary care doctor in a week or so.

Then came the phone calls the following day — first from my doctor's office, then from the mammography center — telling me the radiologist had seen something that didn't look quite right. I needed to come back for another mammogram and this time an ultrasound exam, too.

Cancer patients who do rehabilitation before they begin treatment may recover more quickly from surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer specialists say. But insurance coverage for cancer prehabilitation, as it's called, can be spotty, especially if the aim is to prevent problems rather than treat existing ones.

murrayhospital.org

The American Cancer Society predicts nearly 235,000 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed this year. The key word is "invasive" says Murray Calloway County Hospital Wellness Works Coordinator Melissa Ross, because this form of breast cancer can be prevented with routine mammograms. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about their new breast cancer prevention awareness campaign at the hospital.

pranav / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

An assistant professor of biology at Western Kentucky University in Owensboro is looking at the use of plants to treat cancer.  

Chandra Emani is testing basil, ginger, fresh tobacco leaves and neem, a plant common in Asian countries.

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