cancer

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The University of Kentucky says it has received an $11.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund a center to study links between obesity and cancer.

nortonchildrens.com

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville say they have partnered to form the Norton Children's Cancer Institute.

Cancer can be caused by tobacco smoke or by an inherited trait, but new research finds that most of the mutations that lead to cancer crop up naturally.

The authors of the study published Thursday poked a hornet's nest by suggesting that many cancers are unavoidable.

Screening for lung cancer using low-dose CT scans can save lives, but at a cost: Tests frequently produce anxiety-producing false alarms and prompt unnecessary procedures.

A study from the Veterans Health Administration lays out the considerable effort required by both patients and doctors to undertake screening.

"I have heard people say 'what's the big deal, it's just a CT,' " says Dr. Linda Kinsinger, who ran the study at the VA. "But I think what we tried to show is it's a lot more than just a CT."

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new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6.

Privately insured people with cancer were diagnosed earlier and lived longer than those who were uninsured or were covered by Medicaid, according to two recent studies.

TBI

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has charged a former Martin, TN police officer for an alleged theft of $18,000 from a charity established to benefit a 2-year-old cancer victim.  

34-year-old Guy Pryor is charged with one count of theft over $10,000.

Duncan Noakes, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky firefighters are seeking legislative approval to include certain cancers as cause for issuing death benefits to surviving family members. The measure, which allows for an $80,000 death benefit from the state, passed out of a Senate committee last week. 

Pharmacies across the U.S. will begin receiving shipments of a generic form of the revolutionary cancer pill Gleevec this week after the drug lost its patent protection on Monday.

The generic version of drug, known as imatinib, is likely to cost about 30 percent less than brand-name Gleevec, says Kal Sundaram, the CEO of Sun Pharmaceuticals, the Mumbai, India-based company that will make the first generic.

Remember the headlines a few weeks back, when the World Health Organization categorized red and processed meats as cancer-causing?

Turns out, the techniques you use to prepare your meat seem to play into this risk.

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