Brett Guthrie

Lisa Autry, WKYU

  A Kentucky congressman says he’s convinced that Russia tried to interfere in this country’s presidential election. 

However, Representative Brett Guthrie says there is no evidence that President Donald Trump was involved.

"There's no evidence at all of any collusion between what Russia did, or attempted to do, and the Trump administration," stated Guthrie.  "That's what the special counsel Robert Mueller is looking into, but my point is let's not create facts before they exist."

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

A Kentucky Congressman is speaking out against what he calls misconceptions about his party’s proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. 

David Brinkley, WKYU

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman says he thinks lawmakers will need to have a greater say in any future U.S. military action in Syria.

Natalia Merzlyakova, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky’s congressional members are tipping their hand as to how they will vote Thursday on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

Rhonda Miller, WKYU

A group of  citizens from the Bowling Green area met with Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie on Wednesday to express concern about issues that have arisen with the administration of President Trump.

iStockPhoto

Days after President Donald Trump’s executive order relating to immigration and refugees, Kentucky’s elected officials are mostly silent on the issue.

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman says his party needs to tone down some of its rhetoric about illegal immigration, and better explain how its economic policies could help those coming to the country legally.

A federal law championed by First Lady Michelle Obama is up for reauthorization later this year. 

At Plano Elementary School in Warren County Thursday, Kentucky’s 2nd District Congressman Brett Guthrie solicited feedback on the Healthy  and Hunger-free Kids Act which became law in 2010. 

Following a roundtable discussion, Guthrie said he learned that schools want more flexibility in preparing meals.

"Everyone wants kids to eat healthy, but when you write a single rule that comes out of Washington, DC, that goes into every cafeteria of every school, they don't always work," Guthrie told WKU Public Radio.

While the federal act has brought more nutritious meals into school cafeterias, much of the food is wasted. 

"If a kid doesn't pick up an apple, the school won't get reimbursed from the federal government if the kid is on free or reduced lunch," Guthrie explained.  "A lot of times they have to make the kids pick up an apple and walk out with it knowing that it's going in the garbage."

Cafeteria managers says the healthy food has resulted in more children bringing their lunch from home.  Most of the children not eating cafeteria food are from middle and upper class families that pay full price for their lunch.  It hurts schools monetarily when those children who pay full price bring their lunch from home. 

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman is predicting a major “re-write” of the Affordable Care Act next year.

Bowling Green Republican Brett Guthrie would have an up-close view of such an effort, as he was named vice-chair of a key House Health Subcommittee Wednesday.

Guthrie says the complicated structure of the federal health law makes it difficult to change certain aspects of the A.C.A without creating unintended consequences elsewhere.

“You hear a lot of people say, ‘let’s keep what we like and fix what we don’t like.’ And there are things that we need as part of our system. We need to make sure that people have health care if they’re sick, and pre-existing conditions don’t push them out of the marketplace.”

But the Bowling Green Republican said adding so many additional Americans to the healthcare system made it impossible for President Obama to keep his pledge that everyone could keep the doctor and health plan that they wanted.

The Congressman also expressed concern about states—like Kentucky—that expanded their Medicaid rolls as part of Obamacare.

Leach on Congressional Campaign, Minimum Wage

Apr 18, 2014
http://www.ronleach4ky.com/

The man hoping to be the first Democrat to represent Kentucky’s second U.S. House seat since 1994 says he decided to run for Congress while overseas. Ron Leach is a retired Army major and former special forces medic who lives in Meade County.

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