bats

Environment
2:36 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Deadly Bat Disease Found in Mammoth Cave National Park

The first confirmed case of a fatal bat disease has been found in Mammoth Cave National Park. White Nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats across North America. Nearly all infected bats die, and so far scientists haven’t been able to stop the spread of the fungus.

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Environment
2:48 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Man-made Cave to Offer Bats Haven from Disease

The cave's construction underway in late August: an entrance for humans is visible on the right, while bats enter the chimney-like structure.
Daniel Potter/ WPLN

New tenants wanted: must be quiet during the day, must enjoy bugs. It might not sound like your kind of real estate, but then, you’re not a bat.

A new man-made cave near Clarksville is being built to give thousands of bats a safe haven from a devastating infection called white-nose syndrome; the experimental project may house bats’ best hope against the disease.

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Environment
4:20 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

Stopping White Nose Syndrome

Ryan von Linden New York Department of Environmental Conservation

Since 2006, White Nose Syndrome has been decimating bat populations east of the Mississippi. Last month, the disease was found in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, and biologists expect it to spread further. Kentucky Public Radio’s Erica Peterson went with state researchers into a Meade County cave to see what’s being done to stop White Nose Syndrome.

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-Science & Technology - WKMS
4:42 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

White-Nose Syndrome in Breckinridge Could Threaten Area Populations

Little brown bat; close-up of nose with fungus
Ryan von Linden New York Department of Environmental Conservation

Wildlife officials say the fatal fungus called white nose syndrome affecting bats across the U.S. has been confirmed in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. It was discovered in Trigg County in April, but the three sites in Breckinridge County indicate that the disease is spreading in the commonwealth. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Biologist Andy Randomski says biologists at the Clarks River Wildlife Refuge in our region have been working to monitor bat populations in the area and hopefully prevent the spread into this area.

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