bald eagle

One of two eggs laid by a mated pair of bald eagles in Washington, D.C., is hatching, according to officials watching the nest at the U.S. National Arboretum.

"We have a pip in process!!" said an update sent by the American Eagle Foundation on Thursday morning, which clarifies, "It's not technically a full pip until there is a full hole."

The hole in the shell appears to have grown larger as of mid-afternoon Thursday, but the eaglet has yet to emerge. The group says it could take between 12 and 48 hours for the eaglet to fully emerge from the shell.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to a conviction in the shooting of a bald eagle in Grand Rivers. Officials say the federally protected eagle was shot sometime between December 25, 2015 and January 2, 2016.

landbetweenthelakes.us

Winter is the peak season for eagle viewing at Land Between the Lakes, where more than 100 bald eagles and some golden eagles can be seen residing and hunting for fish. On Sounds Good, Austin Carter speaks with naturalist Monica Main about the series of van tours and river yacht cruises through Land Between the Lakes to see these birds in the wild.

 Seymour Bluffs is an American Bald Eagle who travels back in time to an Illini Indian village located along the Mississippi River and helps the natives resolve a problem with the mysterious Piasa Bird in the children's book by author Phyllis Bechtold. On Sounds Good, Kate speaks with Bechtold about her upcoming presentation on May 31 at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site, and the life-sized Seymour Bluffs who will be on-hand to help Bechtold autograph her books for sale in this children's event.

Hear the Conversation:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Kentucky Department of Parks is urging nature lovers to make plans now for prime eagle-watching early next year.

Dr. Steve White joined Murray State University in 1981 about the same time as the local TVA hacking program was underway. Captive-born eaglets were released into the wild without human contact to repopulate the region whose habitat is preferred by eagles. Eagles stay where they learn to fly and today the resident population is stable and thriving. Dr. White gives the historical perspective.