Alzheimer's

alz.org

There are 60,000 Kentuckians with Alzheimer's disease and 270,000 caregivers in the Commonwealth. It's a good number of caregivers, says Kimberly Fondaw, Alzheimer's Ambassador for the First District in western Kentucky, but there needs to be more education to the public and funding for research before it bankrupts the system. This year alone, we've paid out $153 billion dollars in Medicare and Medicaid to those with Alzheimer's and the numbers are growing, she says. Tracy Ross speaks with Fondaw on Sounds Good about upcoming awareness events in Hopkinsville and Paducah. 

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An estimated 80,000 Kentuckians are serving as caregivers to family members suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia.

The Greater Kentucky-Southern Indiana chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association wants more of those caregivers to be better informed about resources available to them.

The face of Alzheimer's isn't always old. Sometimes it belongs to someone like Giedre Cohen, who is 37, yet struggles to remember her own name.

Until about a year ago, Giedre was a "young, healthy, beautiful" woman just starting her life, says her husband, Tal Cohen, a real estate developer in Los Angeles. Now, he says, "her mind is slowly wasting away."

People like Giedre have a rare gene mutation that causes symptoms of Alzheimer's to appear before they turn 60.

Music & Memory, Facebook Page

Haws Memorial Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Fulton is embarking on the use of the program Music & Memory with those suffering with Alzheimer's and dementia. The Center's Jo Ann Roy says that they have about twelve iPods in use with residents and in a month or so they will bring families in to view the documentary about Music & Memory titled "Alive Inside" at the facility. In Murray, Cheri Theatres offers two free viewings of "Alive Inside," winner of the Audience Award at last year's Sundance Film Festival. Kate Lochte speaks with Deborah Ferris, Regional Program Coordinator for Music & Memory about the organization and how iPods full of music help give patients therapeutic joy.

Working with an Arts Access Grant titled "The Art of Caregiving" from the Kentucky Arts Council, Murray author Constance Alexander is coordinating collaborators across arts agencies and healthcare providers in a positive community conversation about patients and caregivers at the end of life. There's a public forum at the Calloway County Public Library at 710 Main Street in Murray, Thursday starting at 7 p.m. Alexander's commentary relates to these community activities focusing on a new support group in Murray.

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The University of Kentucky is about to launch a clinical study that tests an existing medication as a treatment for Alzheimer Disease.

Researchers at UK’s Alzheimer Disease Center think a cholesterol-lowering class of drugs known as fibrates can also prevent the deadly dementia related ailment. 

In the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, families face new questions as they adjust. What does the diagnosis mean? What kinds of plans need to be made? What resources are available to help? There are workshops for caregivers for loved ones in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease next week and Helene French, Community Outreach Coordinator, Alzheimer's Association, in Evansville brings us more information about them on Sounds Good. Click here for more information about the event.

today.ucla.edu

Professor of Psychiatry at UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine and author, Dr. Gary Small is going against the widely accepted theory that Alzheimer's disease is an unavoidable consequence of aging. Dr. Small's argument is to be found in his book, The Alzheimer's Prevention Program. The core elements in his seven day plan include memory training, food that promotes a healthy brain, the importance of aerobic and strength exercise, managing stress and maintaining strong emotional connections.