agriculture

Meat has a greater impact on the environment than pretty much any other food we eat. As The Salt has reported, billions of cows, pigs, sheep and poultry we raise as livestock guzzle massive quantities of water and generate at least 10 percent of the total greenhouse gases attributed to human activity.

But scientists say we've been slow to acknowledge yet another side effect of our taste for meat: nitrogen pollution.

Giancarlo Dessi, via Wikimedia Commons

 The United States Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded a $90,000 grant toward the construction of a hydroponic greenhouse on the west campus of Muhlenberg County High School.

The grant, part of the USDA’s Community Food Projects program, goes to a consortium made up of MCHS, Madisonville Community College and Muhlenberg County 4-H.

Author: Jim Champion, via Wikimedia Commons

  Officials in Christian County are awaiting the results of a study aimed at assessing the economic impact of agriculture in the area.

Wade Morgen / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Heavy rainfall across the state is impacting springtime planting. 

University of Kentucky Agricultural Meteorologist Matt Dixon said the state has averaged seven inches of precipitation over the last month. Dixon says that's about three inches above normal. 

As I scrolled through tweets about a panel on agricultural entrepreneurs at the SXSW Eco conference earlier this month, one caught my eye. The sender was Vance Crowe, Monsanto's director of millennial engagement.

Corporate America is currently caught up in a torrid infatuation with millennials, who befuddle and torment the companies who want their dollars.

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This spring’s wet weather may have a detrimental effect on the fall’s tobacco crop.

Calloway County Agriculture Extension Agent Matt Chadwick says most farmers set their plants before Memorial Day, but this year many are on a late schedule. He also says the tobacco that has been set has suffered some damage from recent storms.

Farmer’s markets may see a delay in produce this season due to an extraordinarily cold winter. Meredith Hall, Agriculture Agent for Crittenden County, says planting is two weeks behind schedule and cold weather crops like lettuce, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts, may be late to market. 

Author: Jim Champion, via Wikimedia Commons

With the U.S. government reopened and a budget crisis averted for now, Congress has shifted it's attention towards the Farm Bill. 

The multi-year legislation governs agriculture programs and ranges from regulating food prices and rural development to conservation and nutrition assistance. The bill has caused contention among members over spending cuts, and the past shutdown has only slowed discussion.  

Kentucky Farm Bureau Director of National Affairs Joe Cain said if Congress doesn’t reauthorize crop insurance provisions by the January 1st deadline, it would cause uncertainty for farming lenders and could result in a rise in food prices.

Murray State’s Hutson School of Agriculture Dean Tony Brannon joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good. They take a look at agriculture in the region and across the state, how technology has changed the course of agriculture and education, and work at the Breathitt Veterinary Center. See more about the Hutson School of Agriculture.

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A new agriculture forecast says plenty of rain and cooler temperatures mean Kentucky grain farmers could see productive yields later this year.

The Kentucky office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service says 85 percent of the commonwealth's corn crop and 84 percent of its soybean crop are rated good or excellent.

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