agriculture

Erica Peterson WFPL

With no changes to greenhouse gas emissions, people living across the United States can expect a marked increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme storms. That’s the conclusion of a study released earlier this month from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  

via KY Center for Ag & Rural Development Facebook page

 Kentucky Center for Agriculture and Rural Development, or KCARD, is featuring two programs that could bring money to Kentucky farmers and agribusiness.

Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World

Donald Trump’s successful campaign focused on illegal immigration and a pledge to deport millions of people. But those migrants are also a big part of the farm labor force making our food system work. Nicole Erwin of Ohio Valley ReSource reports on what an immigration clampdown could mean for agriculture.

www.wtcky.org

A Lexington-based trade consulting group is preparing for a business trip to Cuba in 2017.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

The use of big data is revolutionizing big agriculture: detailed information guides farmers through business transactions, planting schedules, fertilizer applications and far more. This data harvest promises greater profit and greener production techniques. But as Nicole Erwin reports, some thorny questions are cropping up about just who owns the farming data.

Credit Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

Small-scale farmers in the region often find it challenging to keep their land sustainable while staying competitive in the marketplace. Nicole Erwin of Ohio Valley ReSource visited a farm that’s doing both with a method called rotational grazing. She found that this “new” approach grows from some very old ideas.

Ryan Quarles / Facebook

Kentucky agriculture commissioner Ryan Quarles has joined Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s agricultural advisory committee.

High Hopes For Hemp

Jun 27, 2016
Nicole Erwin, Ohio Valley ReSource

Farmers throughout the Ohio Valley want to revive a crop that was once a staple in the region: hemp. After a ban that lasted more than half a century, the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to grow hemp in research programs. Growers and processors in Kentucky are aggressively putting that research program to work in hopes of winning a share of the booming market for hemp products. 

John Null/WKMS

Over the weekend, five of the six candidates running to succeed retiring Congressman Ed Whitfield as the next Representative of Kentucky’s 1st Congressional District took part in a Kentucky Farm Bureau forum in Murray.


Meat has a greater impact on the environment than pretty much any other food we eat. As The Salt has reported, billions of cows, pigs, sheep and poultry we raise as livestock guzzle massive quantities of water and generate at least 10 percent of the total greenhouse gases attributed to human activity.

But scientists say we've been slow to acknowledge yet another side effect of our taste for meat: nitrogen pollution.

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