African American

Courtesy of Rosa Hudspeth

Pogue Library at Murray State University is home to numerous special collections and oral history projects. One of these recordings is the voice of Murray resident Florence Kenley-Hudspeth, who is now 80. In an oral history recording with Murray State in 1979, she reflects on life growing up in a time when Murray was a segregated community. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, describing Hudspeth's experience growing up in the 1940s and 50s and her thoughts on the Civil Rights Movement.

Courtesy of Pogue Library

Long-time Winston-Salem basketball coach Clarence "Big House" Gaines was born and raised in Paducah. He went on to win numerous awards, including being one of the few African American coaches inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, about the legacy of Big House Gaines and his thoughts on Paducah and the region before, during and after the Civil Rights Movement.

Used with permission from New York State Archives. New York (State). Governor. Public information photographs, 1910-1992. Series 13703-83, Box 15, No. 1314 (Job #2-364)

Ersa Hines Poston grew up in western Kentucky during the great depression, went on to work for New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller during the Civil Rights movement and was appointed by President Carter to the Civil Service Commission, the first African American woman appointed to this position. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, about the life of this remarkable woman from our region.

As an African-American, John Boyd Jr. might not be what Americans imagine when they think of a typical farmer. But Boyd has been farming his entire life, like his father, grandfather and great-grandfather before him. He grows wheat, corn and soybeans and has cattle at his southwestern Virginia farm.

Pogue Library at Murray State University is home to numerous special collections and oral history projects. Tucked among these documents is the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph of Coretta Scott King and her daughter Bernice at Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral taken by Owensboro native Moneta Sleet Jr. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, about how this photo, and a thank you letter signed by Sleet ended up in the archives at Murray State.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS, courtesy of Pogue Library

Pogue Library at Murray State University is home to numerous special collections, including letters an articles from an influential educator, Clarence Timberlake. Timberlake is considered the "Founder of Vocational Education in Kentucky," devoting his life working to improve education for African Americans in the Commonwealth. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf explored this collection with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, and learns how his legacy left a lasting impact on the region, namely in Paducah, Madisonville and Hopkinsville.

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We hope you join us for a panel on Race Relations in Hopkinsville on October 22 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the War Memorial Building, titled "Where are we now, where do we want to be, and how do we get there?"

A panel of community leaders generate discussion on issues facing Hopkinsville. Panelists are Reverend Lisa Lewis-Balboa, Gwenda Motley, Matt Snorton, Judge Arnold Lynch, and Chief Clayton Sumner. WKMS is moderating the discussion.

Please note: Due to programming restrictions, this program will not be streaming online, but can be heard on an analog radio.  

Murray State’s listener supported public radio service WKMS-FM celebrates a special part of the station’s history with a recreation of The Black Cats Jump: Part Two, a thirteen part series of hour-long programs on African American big band music, originally created by the late Bobby Bryan and lovingly restored by Dr. Todd Hill and Mark Welch. 

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

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