African American

Anne Blessing grew up in a classic antebellum house with double-decker porches and gorgeous brickwork, just steps from Charleston Harbor. For years, the home in Charleston, S.C., had been a stop on a popular historic home tour.

"Normally, people want to see the fancier parts of the house," Blessing said. "You know, where in Colonial times they would have taken people upstairs to the nicer parlor; the dining room, of course, with the beautiful wood and all the molding."

Over the past few months, as the contentious ghost of Robert E. Lee galloped through the headlines, Southern food historian Michael W. Twitty's thoughts turned to the bittersweet connection his family shares with the Confederate general.

The NAACP has issued a travel advisory for the state of Missouri, citing recent "race-based incidents" and new state legislation that makes it harder for fired employees to prove racial discrimination.

It's the first time the national civil rights organization has issued a travel warning for an entire state, the Kansas City Star reports.

The group warns "African American travelers, visitors and Missourians" to "exercise extreme caution" in the state.

Memory Sunday: Churches Spread Alzheimer’s Awareness

Aug 2, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

Experts on Alzheimer’s disease say it remains a “silent epidemic” among African-Americans, and that many do not receive the treatment they need. Researchers are joining religious leaders to  use the power of the pulpit to raise awareness.

It may be the most explosive response ever to a TV show that hasn't shot a frame, doesn't have a script, or even a plot written yet.

All we know is HBO's Confederate will be a TV show set in a modern America where the Confederacy never lost the Civil War and slavery still exists. After days at the center of the controversy, Executive Producer Nichelle Tramble Spellman says the experience has been like getting "a crash course in crazy."

African-Americans experience a significant drop in their blood pressure after they move out of highly segregated neighborhoods and into more integrated neighborhoods, researchers report Monday.

A study involving more than 2,000 African-Americans found that those who moved from the most-segregated neighborhoods to less-segregated neighborhoods later experienced lower systolic blood pressure, a factor in heart attacks and strokes.

For decades, black Americans have been dying at a higher rate than white Americans.

That's still true overall. But now there's some good news about this long, disturbing trend: The overall death rate for black Americans fell 25 percent between 1999 and 2015, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A record number of people, at least 166, were exonerated last year after being wrongly convicted of crimes, according to the most recent annual report from the National Registry of Exonerations.

African-American women are more likely to be infected with HIV than other women, and many don't know it. So public health officials and advocates are trying to get the word out about PrEP, pre-exposure prophylaxis. It's a daily medication that helps prevent HIV infection.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

An African American couple who recently moved to Lyon County have become a target of confusion and fear on social media. Area residents have taken to outlets including Facebook and Topix voicing concern about a rumored ‘Muslim’ group of ‘Refugees’ on private property.

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