addiction

When Jack O'Connor was 19, he was so desperate to beat his addictions to alcohol and opioids that he took a really rash step. He joined the Marines.

"This will fix me," O'Connor thought as he went to boot camp. "It better fix me or I'm screwed."

After 13 weeks of sobriety and exercise and discipline, O'Connor completed basic training, but he started using again immediately.

"Same thing," he says. "Percocet, like, off the street. Pills."

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Overcoming a psychological addiction like alcohol and drug use can be an incredibly difficult process and just as there is a stigma attached to those suffering from illness, there is also a self-stigma and shame from the individuals suffering, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Murray State Psychology faculty member. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the self-stigma and how basic mindfulness workshops can prevent relapse in those trying to overcome an addiction.

Wikimedia Commons/Author: Jr de Barbosa

An eastern Kentucky nurse is suing the state for not allowing her to take addiction medicine like Suboxone or Vivitrol while she’s out of jail on bond.

The terms set by Floyd County District Court, where Stephanie Watson’s court case is still pending, prevent her from using medically-assisted drug treatment.

Baptist Health Paducah, Facebook

Baptist Health Paducah presents its 8th Annual Addiction & Compulsive Behaviors Symposium for healthcare professionals on Saturday, October 18th. Topics include marijuana use, sex addiction, alcoholism and youth drug addiction. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte learns more about it from Dr. Patrick Withrow, director of outreach, and Maria Hill, director of education.

Baptist Health Paducah, Facebook

Retired cardiologist and current director of outreach for Baptist Health Paducah, Dr. Patrick Withrow joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good with information about the 7th Annual Addiction and Compulsive Behavior Symposium on Saturday, October 26, at the hospital, including the manager of Kentucky's KASPER drug reporting system. The target audience will be professionals who deal with these problems. See more at Baptist Health Paducah's website.

www.nlm.nih.gov

Tennessee officials hope a new law requiring doctors to check a database before prescribing certain drugs will help curb addiction and prevent deaths. The state's controlled substances monitoring database has been around for several years, but its use has not been mandatory. Starting Jan. 1, doctors and others who prescribe drugs must register with the database. They will have to start checking it every time they prescribe certain powerful drugs, with limited exceptions starting April 1.