addiction

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis has brought another health problem, as rising numbers of needle drug users are contracting a serious form of heart infection called endocarditis. The rate of endocarditis doubled in the region over a decade, and many patients require repeated, expensive treatment and surgery as they return to drug use and once again become infected.

Rebecca Kiger

We’ve heard the statistics on the region’s heroin crisis, and how many have fallen into addiction. But one person’s story can tell a lot about what it takes to get out. As part of an occasional series on the Affordable Care Act, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores how the law expanded substance abuse treatment for thousands, including Wendy Crites. Producers Glynis Board and Rebecca Kiger bring us the story of Crites’ struggle for sobriety, told in her own words.

Chalermchai Chamnanyon, 123rf Stock Photo

The heroin abuse problem in Kentucky is causing lawmakers to look for new ways to prevent sometimes deadly consequences of opioid use. 

Courtesy Nationwide Children’s Hospital

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis is reaching a new generation as the number of drug affected babies rises at an astonishing rate. 

via Jan Fidler 123rfstock photos

A treatment center specializing in opioid addiction has opened in Calloway County. Clear Creek Medical Center is the second location of Dr. Robert Howard’s western Kentucky-based program.

Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

The Centers for Disease Control recently ranked the counties in the nation with the greatest risk for an HIV outbreak due to needle-injected drugs. The top ten are all in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia. Needle exchange programs can limit the risk of infection, but they also challenge some deeply held convictions. Mary Meehan of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports from Powell County, Kentucky, where the opioid crisis has forced a religious community to reconsider some beliefs.

CASA: Caring For Kids Caught In The Addiction Crisis

Dec 26, 2016
Jeff Young | Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley’s opioid epidemic has effects far beyond the individuals struggling through addiction, with families and children suffering as well. An organization that helps children in abuse cases now sees substance abuse as a leading contributor, and could be overwhelmed by the addiction crisis.

FRIENDS OF SINNERS

A faith-based addiction recovery program in Owensboro broke ground on a new residence for women this week. 

The new facility being built by the group “Friends of Sinners” is in response to a growing demand in the region.

Alexandra Kanik, Ohio Valley ReSource

The opioid epidemic is on the agenda for political campaigns from the presidential race down to the local level in the Ohio Valley region. Election Day could shape the response to the crisis in states with some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdoses.

James Sweasy

Beginning this week doctors fighting the region’s opioid addiction crisis will have a little more to work with. The federal government will allow doctors to treat more patients with a drug called buprenorphine. That medication has solid support from science, but remains controversial in some circles. Aaron Payne of Ohio Valley ReSource visited three addiction treatment centers with three very different approaches, and found that there’s no silver bullet when it comes to addiction. 

Pages