2016 U.S. Senate race

John Null/WKMS

Thanks to the Republican Party of Kentucky approving a caucus instead of its usual primary next year, Kentucky’s junior U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is running for both president and a second term in Washington.

Paul concluded a two-day tour of the commonwealth Tuesday with a town hall-style event in Fulton County. Paul told a crowd at Fulton’s Pontotoc Community Center that he is opposed to sending ground troops to the Middle East to fight ISIS.

Photo provided by Rand Paul for US Senate

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is making the rounds in Kentucky this week, taking a break from the presidential campaign trail and concentrating efforts on his Senate re-election.


Republican Party of Kentucky chairman and executive director Steve Robertson is stepping down after this November’s election.

Mike Biagi - a field representative for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell - will succeed Robertson. Biagi will take over Robertson’s executive director duties next month.

WKMS/John Null

Presidential hopeful and U.S. Senator Rand Paul says he won’t attend the Fancy Farm political picnic in Graves County next month.

Paul is also running for re-election to his Senate seat next year, and experts say this could prompt future challengers to criticize Paul for not paying attention to his home state while he runs for two offices simultaneously.

Jacob Ryan/WFPL

With just over four months until November’s election, a national pollster is calling Kentucky’s gubernatorial race a toss-up

Public Policy Polling released a poll Tuesday showing Republican Matt Bevin leading Democrat Jack Conway 38 to 35 percent, just over the poll’s 2.9 percent margin of error. Independent Drew Curtis received 6 percent support, but more than 20 percent of voters were undecided.

Republican Party of Kentucky/Facebook

  The Kentucky Republican Party appears ready to change the way it nominates presidential candidates—something that would help U.S. Sen. Rand Paul run for the White House and Senate in 2016.

The executive committee of the state party gave preliminary approval Saturday to Paul’s request to hold a presidential caucus next year, instead of a primary election.


Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator Rand Paul has become the first Republican presidential hopeful to assemble a 50-state network, a little less than two years before the 2016 primary season begins.

The Washington Post reports that Paul has more than 200 people on his team nationwide.