2016 presidential race

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.

Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.

LISTEN: The Making of Clinton and Trump

Sep 21, 2016
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The 2016 presidential campaign has in many ways become a question of character. Even though Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have incredibly loyal supporters, the two candidates also inspire some intensely negative feelings among voters. Clinton and Trump are the two most unpopular candidates since modern polling began.

The first presidential debate, to be held next Monday, Sept. 26, at Hofstra University in New York, will be divided into three 30-minute segments on three topics, according to the Commission On Presidential Debates co-chairman, Frank Fahrenkopf.

That's a bit different from the original announcement for the first debate, which said there would be six 15-minute segments. Farhrenkopf told NPR that it was moderator Lester Holt's decision to combine the segments.

The topics will be: the Direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America.

Anne Kitzman, 123rf Stock Photo

Governor Matt Bevin's spokeswoman is leaving to take a position with the Donald Trump campaign. 

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin said Wednesday that his recent speech containing remarks about shedding blood was a warning against American apathy.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

Rob Canning, WKMS / Fancy Farm, Bevin

Update: Gov. Bevin's comments have drawn fire from Kentucky Democrats. See below.  

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says blood might be shed if Democrat Hillary Clinton is elected president.  

lightwise, 123rf Stock Photo

More than 40,000 Kentuckians have registered to vote or have updated their registration through the online portal GoVoteKy.com.

Ryland Barton, WFPL, cropped

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asked Kentucky Republicans to pray for his party to maintain control amid what he calls a "challenging" election cycle. 

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