Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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McCracken County Public Library

While the Civil War made its way through the South, baseball was burying its roots in Paducah. Uniting the community through decades of peace and war, it is a sport that remains an integral artifact of the city's history. On Sounds Good today, author and baseball historian Randy Morgan speaks about his Evening Upstairs program for the McCracken County Public Library on August 20th, based on his book Paducah's Native Baseball Team: A History of Minor League Baseball in Paducah. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

National Night Out is a campaign designed to give people in high crime neighborhoods a secure area for local residents to have a block party. Since Murray isn't really a high crime area, the Murray Police Department has helped adapt the concept to be an emergency and public services block party, where the public can interact with first responders and public services to become more familiar with who they are in a non-emergency setting. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Sgt. David Howe of the Murray Police Department about the event including some unique educational response demonstrations.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Human Resources professionals and business managers across the region are invited to the annual networking conference hosted by the Four Rivers Society for Human Resource Managers August 28 in Paducah. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Teri Ray, Lecturer in The Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business at Murray State about the event, about why networking is helpful for HR professionals and some tips on working in the field. 

James Hawkins, publicdomainpictures.net

Nine-banded armadillos can be found in Land Between the Lakes, eating pesky insects like yellowjackets, wasps and ants (and some plants, too). On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Woodlands Nature Station Lead Naturalist John Pollpeter to learn more facts about the leathery little mammal, including a unique reproductive trait, what happens if you scare one and whether or not you can get leprosy if you eat one.

RIVERfront Concert Series

Cool, clear weather will set the bluesy tone for tonight's RIVERfront Concert, the second-to-last of seven concerts this season. Paducah Parks Services Special Events Director Molly Tommasallo speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good to tell us more about tonight's bands, Adam and the H-Bomb and Tee Dee Young. 

The Lakes of Paducah Logo

On 250 acres of lush, natural scenery with three lakes, a new two-story gray stone senior center is waiting for "beautiful people" to make it their home. The Lakes of Paducah is opening this month, and Executive Director Shannon Livingston talks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good today to tell us more about the new 42-unit assisted living center. 

Amazon.com

As the sweltering heat of summer persists, thoughts of sweet iced tea and frozen lemonade taunt us. But how did ice become an American necessity? Dr. Jonathan Rees of Colorado State University speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good today about his new book, Refrigeration Nation, and Americans' addiction to ice.  

Tomato Art Fest, Facebook

This Friday and Saturday, East Nashville's Five Points neighborhood anticipates tens of thousands of visitors for the Tomato Art Fest founded by Meg and Bret MacFadyn, owners of the Art and Invention Gallery. The neighborhood pitched in to grow the event, touted by the Oxford American and Southern Living as one of the "five things you need to know in the South right now." On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Meg MacFadyn about the festival celebrating all things tomato, the concert Friday night and area art vendors.

westkentucky.kctcs.edu

WKCTC's Inland Logistics and Marine Institute is funded by a portion of a $23.8 million dollar grant through the US Labor Department Trade Adjustments and Assistance Community College and Career Training Program, to start and grow their program and improve online content in an effort to provide training for high-skilled, high-wage positions. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with the program's director Troy Courtney about the program and the open house on August 10.

SIU Press

Flatboats were the most prevalent form of transportation on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers through the late 1700's and early 1800's. While the harsh, active river currents and salvaging settlers have left little to explore of these boats, the remains of one vessel have been found in the muddy banks of the Ohio. Kate Lochte welcomes SIU Carbondale Center for Archaeological Investigations Director Dr. Mark Wagner to Sounds Good to discuss his new book "The Wreck of the America in Southern Illinois: A Flatboat on the Ohio River."

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