Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Roxy Todd

Rural communities across the Ohio Valley are shrinking as more young people leave to find work, to escape troubles, or to follow dreams. US Census data show West Virginia, for example, losing population faster than almost every other state. West Virginia Public Broadcasting and the Ohio Valley ReSource are following six young people from the region to get the personal stories behind these population numbers. 

U.S. Dept. of Energy

Coal and natural gas may dominate the Ohio Valley’s energy but the region also has a long history with nuclear power. Some Kentucky officials hope a new law might help the struggling industry get back some of its old glow.

Lisa Gillespie | wfpl.org

Three Kentucky residents are suing Governor Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear, claiming the state’s prohibition of medical marijuana is unconstitutional. The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in Franklin Circuit Court. The suit relies on arguments that haven’t been successful in other states, but the plaintiffs are hoping Kentucky will be different.

Nicole Erwin

When President Trump picked the Ohio Valley as the setting to promote his infrastructure plan, he also drew attention to an overlooked part of the nation’s transportation system: inland waterways. Agriculture, energy, and manufacturing interests all depend heavily on the Ohio’s aging navigation system.

via Martin O'Malley's Facebook page

Former Democratic Maryland Governor and Presidential Candidate Martin O'Malley says the Democratic Party can make a comeback after last year's election losses so long as the focus is on jobs and wages and not ‘distractions’ from the Trump administration, like alleged ties to Russia or the Paris agreement.

Ohio Valley ReSource

With a speech planned for Cincinnati’s Ohio River waterfront, President Donald Trump has chosen a fitting venue to talk about infrastructure improvements. The Ohio Valley is home to aging highways, bridges, and dams, poor drinking water systems, and weak internet service for many rural residents.

Izzy Broomfield

Nearly half of rural Americans don’t have access to broadband internet -- the high-speed connection many of us take for granted. In 65 counties across Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia, the majority of residents don’t have access to broadband -- that’s one-quarter of all the counties in those three states. Benny Becker reports that some rural communities are banding together to get connected.

Courtesy Jeanna Glisson, cropped

Farms can be peaceful but they are also among the most dangerous places to work. In a five year period more than 170 people were killed in agriculture-related accidents in the Ohio Valley region. Yet safety regulators are often limited in what they can do on farms. Nicole Erwin of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports on efforts to reduce the growing hazards.

Robert McGraw, WOUB

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.

Cinema Systers Film Festival logo

A three-day event billed as ‘the only all-lesbian film festival in the U.S.’ is returning for a second year this weekend in downtown Paducah. Cinema Systers Film Festival organizer Laura Petrie said she was inspired by the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, an annual event that ran for 40 years before closing in 2015.

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